Wednesday 25 April 2018

How to solve the housing crisis

Current planning policy must be abandoned if we want to end the crisis of rocketing property prices and rents

Outside Dublin, not a single county or city of the 29 had an average price above €250,000
Outside Dublin, not a single county or city of the 29 had an average price above €250,000
Colm McCarthy

Colm McCarthy

Despite the sharp increase in prices and rents these last few years, housing remains affordable in most parts of the country. Most Irish people with a steady job can afford to rent accommodation and can at least aspire to home ownership.

The exception is Dublin. The website Daft.ie published average prices for a range of dwelling types in its recent report for the first quarter of 2018. The report broke the figures down for 25 districts in the city and county of Dublin and for 29 areas outside Dublin, the 25 remaining counties plus the four largest provincial cities. The table shows how many areas fall into each price bracket across the country, distinguishing Dublin districts from the rest, for a three-bedroomed semi-detached dwelling.

Outside Dublin, not a single county or city of the 29 had an average price above €250,000. Every single Dublin district was above this threshold and the cheapest area in Dublin (the Dublin 22 postal district) had an average price above the dearest anywhere else (Co Wicklow). In 22 areas outside Dublin (out of 29) the average price was under €150,000. For the cost of a three-bed semi in the dearest Dublin districts you could buy eight such units in the north midlands.

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