Tuesday 13 November 2018

Child protection isn't cheap, but the mess at Tusla runs deeper than money

Too many State agencies look unfit for purpose, but there's no point pretending there are easy solutions, writes Eilis O'Hanlon

RESPONSE: Katherine Zappone, Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, commissioned the report into Tusla after the false allegations made against Maurice McCabe. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
RESPONSE: Katherine Zappone, Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, commissioned the report into Tusla after the false allegations made against Maurice McCabe. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Eilis O'Hanlon

The headline over the latest report into the mismanagement by the State of children at risk read: "Tusla doesn't work efficiently with gardai in abuse probes." The headline could just as easily have been abbreviated to three words: "Tusla doesn't work."

Or perhaps, to be slightly less harsh, four: "Tusla doesn't work efficiently."

The child and family agency will no doubt question that gloomy conclusion, pointing to some of the more positive aspects of the 308-page report released last week by HIQA, the independent Health Information and Quality Authority tasked with driving "continuous improvement in Ireland's health and social care services".

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