Thursday 15 November 2018

UVF had no need of British collusion for Dublin and Monaghan atrocities

Jim Cusack

THE word 'collusion' was used 18 times on RTE's Drivetime evening news report on Wednesday evening - the first main broadcast news report on the publication of Paddy McEntee's report on the Dublin and Monaghan bombings. Only at the end of the 20-minute report, during a brief interview with one of the survivors, Bernadette O'Hanlon, was there a single reference to the UVF, the

THE word 'collusion' was used 18 times on RTE's Drivetime evening news report on Wednesday evening - the first main broadcast news report on the publication of Paddy McEntee's report on the Dublin and Monaghan bombings. Only at the end of the 20-minute report, during a brief interview with one of the survivors, Bernadette O'Hanlon, was there a single reference to the UVF, the Ulster Volunteer Force.

With the balance of the programme so heavily weighed with references to collusion, Mary Wilson posed a question about collusion "between the British authorities and the bombers" it is clear that the perception of the media in Ireland and now probably among the public at large is that there was some form of alliance between the British Government, the British Army, the Royal Ulster Constabulary and the people who planted three bombs in Dublin and one in Church Square in Monaghan on Friday, May 17, 1974.

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