Thursday 22 February 2018

The winds of change that sweep our land

We need ask ourselves what price are we prepared to pay in the name of 'progress', writes Jody Corcoran

Pedal Power........ Children cycle across Kilronan Mountain, Co Roscommon against a backdrop of wind turbines on Corrie Mountain, Co Leitrim.
Photo Brian Farrell 17/9/2008
Pedal Power........ Children cycle across Kilronan Mountain, Co Roscommon against a backdrop of wind turbines on Corrie Mountain, Co Leitrim. Photo Brian Farrell 17/9/2008
Jody Corcoran

Jody Corcoran

Wind turbines are beautiful, right? On its website, Greenpeace says that "while some people express concern about the effect wind turbines have on the beauty of our landscape, others see them as elegant and beautiful". It would be safe to assume that the authors of that statement do not live within sight of a wind farm.

When you fly over Ireland, you can see the vast expanse of the Bog of Allen. It is a stunning sight -- 958 square kilometres of brown mass, like a country within a country. That is where I come from, in the middle of that mass. Less than five miles from home, in a place called Mount Lucas, a process is under way to erect 28 wind turbines.

A year or so ago, the company behind the project, or a sub-contractor, resurfaced many of the roads in the area, to the welcome surprise of locals, but that was before anybody really knew what was involved. The Bog of Allen has done a job for the country before: it provided a livelihood for tens of thousands of families primarily in Offaly, Meath, Kildare, Laois and Westmeath, since Bord na Mona was established in 1946 for the mechanised harvesting of peat.

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