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The threat of violence against women is not a problem they can solve on their own

Martina Devlin


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Cut-out figures of women at the headquarters of London's Metropolitan police force in the wake of the Sarah Everard murder. Photo: Sophie Wingate / PA

Cut-out figures of women at the headquarters of London's Metropolitan police force in the wake of the Sarah Everard murder. Photo: Sophie Wingate / PA

Cut-out figures of women at the headquarters of London's Metropolitan police force in the wake of the Sarah Everard murder. Photo: Sophie Wingate / PA

All day, you’ve been working indoors in a stuffy office. In the evening, you decide to take some exercise and fresh air. Darkness is starting to fall, but it’s not particularly late. You’re strolling along, mind elsewhere, when suddenly your antennae start to twitch. Footsteps behind. Heavy. Walking quickly.

You glance over your shoulder – a man. He’s closing in. Is he trying to overtake you – or catch up with you? All at once, you realise no one else is on the street. There isn’t even a car to wave down, a doorbell to ring. It’s just him and you.


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