Wednesday 22 November 2017

Philip Sherwell: Trayvon case shows America's tortured relationship with race

Throngs of marches gather on Times Square as they listen to a speaker, Sunday, July 14, 2013, in New York, for a protest against the acquittal of volunteer neighborhood watch member George Zimmerman in the 2012 killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla
Throngs of marches gather on Times Square as they listen to a speaker, Sunday, July 14, 2013, in New York, for a protest against the acquittal of volunteer neighborhood watch member George Zimmerman in the 2012 killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla

AWAY from the courthouse in Florida where George Zimmerman had been cleared of Trayvon Martin's murder, an unprecedented operation involving black church and community leaders, federal authorities and Florida police was under way to defuse fears of unrest at the trial's end.

Some feared that an acquittal of Mr Zimmerman could provoke the sort of riots that followed the not guilty verdicts for the Los Angeles police officers captured on video beating up Rodney King in 1991.

Five decades after Martin Luther King's 'I Have A Dream' speech and in the fifth year of America's first black presidency, the agonised soul-searching over the case is a dramatic illustration of America's tortured relationship with race and history.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Don't Miss