Opinion Analysis

Monday 23 October 2017

Jim Cusack: Dublin Mountains could harbour the dark secrets of a serial killer

Antoinette Smith, whose daughters last week appealed for help in solving her murder, was one of a series of women who were killed.

COLD CASE APPEAL: Lisa and Rachel Smith making an appeal last week for information on the murder of their mother, Antoinette Smith, over two decades ago
COLD CASE APPEAL: Lisa and Rachel Smith making an appeal last week for information on the murder of their mother, Antoinette Smith, over two decades ago
Jim Cusack

Jim Cusack

THE Garda press office issues, on a weekly basis, images of people who are reported missing in Ireland. The images are rarely carried in the national media and in most cases the missing person's report is followed within days by a further press release stating the "party concerned" has been located.

This was not the case almost three decades ago. When separated mother-of-two Antoinette Smith disappeared after attending a Slane concert headlined by David Bowie on July 11, 1987, no reports were carried in the national media. Her two daughters, Lisa, aged seven, and Rachel, four, were left frightened and confused and in the care of family.

Autumn and winter passed and there was no sign and no public appeals over the missing 27-year-old, whom friends recall as a fun-loving person and loving mother. Then, on April 3 the following year a family out walking at Glendoo in the Dublin Mountains came across Antoinette's remains. She had been murdered and her body dumped in a bog hole near a pathway used by turf-cutters. Reports at the time stated she had been strangled with her bra and a plastic bag had been placed over her head.

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