| 9.7°C Dublin

Close

Premium

How stars of sport and stage have replaced politicians and popes as the icons of our age

Close

Ireland's Brian O'Driscoll in action during the captain's run ahead of their side's RBS Six Nations Rugby Championship match against Italy. Picture credit: Matt Browne / SPORTSFILE

Ireland's Brian O'Driscoll in action during the captain's run ahead of their side's RBS Six Nations Rugby Championship match against Italy. Picture credit: Matt Browne / SPORTSFILE

Irish icons from left, Eamon de Valera; Michael Collins; rugby legend Brian O’Driscoll; Ronnie Delaney, a 1956 Olympics gold medal winner; and Pope John Paul II.

Irish icons from left, Eamon de Valera; Michael Collins; rugby legend Brian O’Driscoll; Ronnie Delaney, a 1956 Olympics gold medal winner; and Pope John Paul II.

/

Ireland's Brian O'Driscoll in action during the captain's run ahead of their side's RBS Six Nations Rugby Championship match against Italy. Picture credit: Matt Browne / SPORTSFILE

IN BOD WE TRUST. This is the slogan that will be very prominent today; a tribute to Brian O'Driscoll as he plays his last home rugby international at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin.

These words will adorn flags, posters and T-shirts along with standing ovations and a sense of pride and nostalgia. The slogan is a reflection, not only of O'Driscoll's status, popularity and longevity as a giant of Irish sport, but also of modern irreverence and marketing; a reminder that in recent decades we have had new secular icons and heroes to adore and celebrate and they have come to prominence in an era of commercialisation, mass media and communications.


Most Watched





Privacy