Sunday 17 December 2017

How saying the 'wrong' thing can be often right

Political correctness had a good innings, but it can only be a good thing if it's now nearing the end of the road

REMEMBER THE REFERENDUM: Panti Bliss and Yes supporters in Dublin Castle during the gay marriage referendum count. In these days of political correctness, being against same-sex marriage is often taken as ‘evidence of homophobia’. Photo: Brian Lawless
REMEMBER THE REFERENDUM: Panti Bliss and Yes supporters in Dublin Castle during the gay marriage referendum count. In these days of political correctness, being against same-sex marriage is often taken as ‘evidence of homophobia’. Photo: Brian Lawless

Eilis O'Hanlon

The epitaph writers may have spoken too soon when they hailed 2016 as the year that political correctness finally died.

Following an announcement by publisher Simon & Schuster of a $250,000 book deal with Milo Yiannopoulos, controversial editor with conservative news platform Breitbart, fellow authors have rushed to denounce the decision. Apparently, those with the "right" views must be protected at all costs from those with the "wrong" ones, for fear of terrible consequences.

The Chicago Review Of Books has even declared that it will not review a single book published by the company during 2017 in protest.

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