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Does working from home mean falling down the career ladder?

The debate about returning to the office is intensifying as life begins to return to normal. John Meagher asks whether the culture shift caused by the pandemic is likely to last — and who stands to lose out if it does

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‘Work is a space, not a place’: Sinéad Brady, a psychologist who specialises in work, careers and personal development. Photo by Lorraine Teevan

‘Work is a space, not a place’: Sinéad Brady, a psychologist who specialises in work, careers and personal development. Photo by Lorraine Teevan

Maura McAdam, professor of management at DCU

Maura McAdam, professor of management at DCU

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‘Work is a space, not a place’: Sinéad Brady, a psychologist who specialises in work, careers and personal development. Photo by Lorraine Teevan

David Solomon was unequivocal. Working from home, he said, was an “aberration”. And, in case the penny hadn’t dropped, the chief executive of Goldman Sachs pushed the message further: the flight from the office “is not the new normal”.

Like virtually all corporations, the investment bank and financial services giant was forced to let most of its global workforce abandon the office when the Covid-19 pandemic hit last year. Rather than see working from home — or WFH — as the future, Solomon has said that Goldman Sachs bigwigs were anxious to restore the old order.


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