Tuesday 12 December 2017

A bright, studious girl who led the double life of an IRA terrorist

Left: The wreckage after the Old Bailey bombing in March 1973. Right: Dolours Price in her Dublin home in 2010
Left: The wreckage after the Old Bailey bombing in March 1973. Right: Dolours Price in her Dublin home in 2010

The late Dolours Price had recently begun to speak out about her role in IRA murders, writes Jim Cusack

IN THEIR mid and late teens the Price sisters, from Slievegallion Drive in the Andersonstown area of west Belfast, were strikingly pretty girls who would finish their school work and then take to the streets armed, one or both hiding an Armalite rifle under their raincoat, to take part in gun battles with the British army. They were studious, and both went on to St Mary's Teacher Training College not far from their home, where Dolours was accepted on to the then prestigious Bachelor of Education course. Dolours was described as "an intelligent, gifted girl" by her lecturers in St Mary's.

In March 1972 she travelled to Italy at the invitation of the extreme leftist group Lotta Continua to discuss "British repression". She and her male companion were deported after they were arrested for breaching immigration rules.

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