| 18.9°C Dublin

Thousands of homes without power as gusts of 117km/h batter country overnight

A violent storm with winds of up to 117km/h battered the country overnight.

Emergency services were inundated with reports of fallen trees overnight as the country battened down the hatches against a storm which was just under hurricane force.

And heavy rainfall – up to 40mm – was reported across the country.

Roche’s Point in Cork reported the strongest gusts of wind – up to 63 knots, which is just one knot off hurricane force on the Beaufort Scale. This equates to winds of up to 117km/h.

In Dublin, winds hit 100km/h between the hours of 1am to 4am.

And in Malin Head in Co Donegal, gusts of wind were recorded as being up 90km/h. Similar strength winds were also recorded in Co Donegal.

The Southwest of the country fared worse with the rainfall, with Roche’s Point recording 40mm.

Elsewhere, it ranged from 25mm up to 40mm.

Close

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

Storm damage: Fence on Dublin quays (Photo: Orlagh Bailey)

/

The Midlands appears to have escaped the brunt of the storm.

Four thousand homes in Leinster and another 2,000 homes in Munster are without power this morning due to storm damage.

Storm

Speaking to Independent.ie, forecaster Siobhan Ryan said Met Eireann forecast the heavy winds and had received much information overnight about surface water and storm damage.

The fire services are also understood to have had a particularly busy night due to reports about fallen trees throughout the country.

Despite the damage the storm wreaked, it appeared to have somewhat dissipated by 6am this morning.

“The winds have moderated already,” Siobhan said.

“It’s still pretty windy in North east coasts, but they’ll moderate everywhere else,” she said.

However, widespread showers with the risk of thunder have been forecast across the country for the rest of the day.

“There’s definitely shower clouds spiralling in across the country

“There will be widespread heavy showers during the day – the Atlantic counties will bear the brunt, that’s the west, northwest, southwest and Ulster.”

Commute

AA Roadwatch is reporting numerous road blockages around the country.

In Dublin, there is flooding along the quays, in particular along Bachelors Walk.

The A1 Newry to Belfast Road has been closed in both directions, due to flooding at Newry.

There is a tree reported to be down on the N8 by the Horse & Jockey towards Cashel, Tipperary and there is debris on the N72 Mallow/Killarney road and nearby on the Mallow/Kanturk Road.

Also in Cork, there is flooding on the Lower Glanmire Road by Silver Springs, as well as a fallen tree at Hazelwood in Glanmire.

In Kildare, the Naas/Blessington road is closed due to a fallen tree. Diversions are in place.

In Wicklow, there are reports of debris on the N11 at The Tap. There is also a fallen tree on a local road between Beehive and Deputy's Pass.

In Waterford, there is a fallen tree on the Old Mullinvat/Kilmacthomas Road.

There is a two car collision on the Portlaw/ Fiddown Rd (R680) in Kilkenny, AA Roadwatch report. Emergency services are at the scene.

AA Roadwatch are asking motorists to drive with extra care on their morning commute.

Dart services between Howth and Malahide were halted due to damage on overhead lines, but resumed at approximately 8.30am.

'Torrential'

Gardai in Cork last night described the rainfall as "torrential".

"Thankfully, people seem to have heeded all the warnings and stayed inside. There's not many people out and the roads are relatively quiet. There hasn't been any reports of anyone in distress," a garda said.

The frightening weather warnings were met with welcome by some, however as surfers flocked to coastal regions as the strong gales provided perfect weather conditions for big waves.

The water in Bundoran, Co Donegal, was particularly busy, with conditions described as "absolutely epic" by surfers.

Some even made the long cross-country trek from Waterford to brave the elements.

The owner of TurfnSurf Lodge and Surf School Killian O'Kelly said that the ideal conditions in Bundoran were keeping him busy.

"I have met people who have travelled from Waterford to come surfing in Bundoran. We have had loads of people up from Dublin for the weekend and this is just as good as it gets really for the Donegal-Sligo region. We're laughing all the way," said Killian.

"We get big waves on the west coast of Ireland all the time, but there are certain times of year when you get off-shore winds and they just hold up the waves and they make for perfect conditions. It is not sunny, it's grey and overcast - but that combination of big waves and off-shore winds just cannot be beaten," he added.

Flights

Winds at Shannon were reported to be gusting up to 80kmh while Cork Airport experienced wind speeds of 89kmh.

A Ryanair flight from Stansted Airport was unable to land at Shannon and opted to divert to Cork Airport instead. However, the crew of flight FR-109 was unable to land in Cork and decided instead to divert to Dublin.

Another Ryanair flight from Stansted to Cork also attempted an approach, but strong winds prevented the aircraft from landing. The crew also opted to divert to Dublin where winds were gusting at 55.5kmh.

Counties in the midlands were issued with a yellow weather warning.

Online Editors