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Police respond to 911 call from zoo made by a monkey

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California law enforcement responded to a 911 call from a zoo - only to find that they had been called out by Route the monkey. (San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Office)

California law enforcement responded to a 911 call from a zoo - only to find that they had been called out by Route the monkey. (San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Office)

California law enforcement responded to a 911 call from a zoo - only to find that they had been called out by Route the monkey. (San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Office)

California law enforcement responded to a 911 call from a zoo – only to find that they had been called out by a monkey.

San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Office says its dispatchers received the emergency call from the “Zoo to You” in Paso Robles, California, over the weekend.

When the call got disconnected, officers tried to text and call back without any success, the department explained on social media.

“Our Deputies have seen their fair share of ‘monkey business’ in the County. But nothing quite like this,” the department said on Facebook.

But when deputies they got to the zoo they discovered that nobody there had placed the 911 call, and it emerged that Route the Capuchin monkey was to blame.

“Was someone trying to make us look like a monkey’s uncle? Then they all realized... it must have been Route the Capuchin monkey. Apparently, Route had picked up the zoo’s cell phone... which was in the zoo’s golf cart... which is used to travel around the zoo’s 40-acre site,” the department added.

“We’re told Capuchin monkeys are very inquisitive and will grab anything and everything and just start pushing buttons. And that’s what Route did... just so happened it was in the right combination of numbers to call us.”

The department also posted pictures of Route to their Facebook page.

“As you can tell from these photos, Route is a little embarrassed by the whole thing. But you can’t really blame her, after all monkey see, monkey do,” the department wrote.

Capuchin monkeys are common to the tropical forests of Central and South America.

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