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Starbucks to promote non-dairy milk to cut emissions

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By 2030, the cafe chain is targeting 50pc reductions in carbon emissions, water withdrawal and waste sent to landfills. Photo: REUTERS

By 2030, the cafe chain is targeting 50pc reductions in carbon emissions, water withdrawal and waste sent to landfills. Photo: REUTERS

REUTERS

By 2030, the cafe chain is targeting 50pc reductions in carbon emissions, water withdrawal and waste sent to landfills. Photo: REUTERS

Coffee giant Starbucks has claimed dairy products are the biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions across the firm's business.

The huge chain has conducted a sweeping review of the environmental impact of its business and has announced goals for reducing its carbon footprint.

By 2030, the cafe chain is targeting 50pc reductions in carbon emissions, water withdrawal and waste sent to landfills.

An assessment of the company's environmental impact found dairy products produced the most emissions.

Chief executive officer Kevin Johnson said that as part of this drive Starbucks will push consumers to choose milk made from almond, coconuts, soy or oats, whose production is environmentally friendlier than dairy.

"Alternative milks will be a big part of the solution," Mr Johnson said.

"The consumer-demand curve is already shifting."

The Seattle-based company is testing new drinks made with plant-based ingredients and seeking ways to make whipped cream without emitting nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas.

In 2018 Starbucks was responsible for emitting 16 million tonnes of greenhouse gases, using one billion cubic metres of water and dumping 868 metric kilotons of coffee cups and other waste.

The audit was conducted with sustainability consultant Quantis and the World Wildlife Fund.

"We know this journey will be challenging, we know we can't do this alone, and we know this will require others to join us," Mr Johnson said.

The moves come as governments around the world step up action on the environment with measures such as a pending European Union ban on some single-use plastics.

Irish Independent