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What became of the Costa Concordia? A look back at the biggest passenger ship disaster since the Titanic

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The Costa Concordia cruise ship the day after it ran aground, with 4,200 people on board, off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island

The Costa Concordia cruise ship the day after it ran aground, with 4,200 people on board, off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island

The port of Giglio and the Costa Concordia cruise ship that ran aground on January 13, 2012. Photograph by: Max Rossi

The port of Giglio and the Costa Concordia cruise ship that ran aground on January 13, 2012. Photograph by: Max Rossi

Captain of the Costa Concordia, Francesco Schettino. Photograph by: Max Rossi

Captain of the Costa Concordia, Francesco Schettino. Photograph by: Max Rossi

Capsized cruise liner Costa Concordia at the end of the ‘parbuckling’ operation outside Giglio harbour in September, 2013. Photograph by: Tony Gentile

Capsized cruise liner Costa Concordia at the end of the ‘parbuckling’ operation outside Giglio harbour in September, 2013. Photograph by: Tony Gentile

A young couple console each other as they gaze at the ill-fated Costa Concordia liner in Giglio Port on January 13, 2014, a date marking the second anniversary of the maritime tragedy

A young couple console each other as they gaze at the ill-fated Costa Concordia liner in Giglio Port on January 13, 2014, a date marking the second anniversary of the maritime tragedy

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The Costa Concordia cruise ship the day after it ran aground, with 4,200 people on board, off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island

The size of a toppled Empire State Building, freight ship Ever Given — with its towering, Lego-like cargo of green, red and blue containers — was wedged tight in the teal waters of the Suez Canal. The world took a brief break from Covid-19 death tolls to gape at a different number: the estimated $15bn per day lost when one of our planet’s busiest trade routes was effectively choked on Tuesday, March 23.

All that week, reporters — from The New York Times and Bloomberg to Australia’s ABC News — quoted one key man: Nick Sloane, the South African salvage master responsible for refloating the Costa Concordia cruise ship, which sank off the coast of Italy in 2012. When, they asked him if the Ever Given would be freed, Sloane predicted it would be the following Sunday or Monday when the spring tide would bring “a significant increase in water”.


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