Wednesday 21 March 2018

Christmas in New York: 25 tips for a fairy tale visit to the Big Apple

'Tis the season...

Winter in Central Park, New York City. Photo: Getty
Winter in Central Park, New York City. Photo: Getty
Rockefeller Center, Manhattan. Photo: Marley White/NYC & Company
Bloomingdale's Christmas windows, an homage to PT Barnum. Photo: Pól Ó Conghaile
Macy's Herald Square, Midtown, Manhattan. Photo: Joe Buglewicz/ NYC & Company
Wollman Rink, Central Park, Manhattan. Photo: Julienne Schaer/ NYC & Company
Christmas windows in New York... no expense is spared.
Harlem Meer, Central Park. Photo: Julienne Schaer/ NYC & Company
Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn. Photo: Julienne Schaer/ NYC & Company
A Slice of Brooklyn's Christmas Lights & Cannoli Tour. Photo: Marley White/ NYC & Company
Sak's of Fifth Avenue at Christmas. Photo: Pól Ó Conghaile
Columbus Circle Holiday Market. Photo: Malcolm Brown/ NYC & Company
New York City from the Rockefeller Center at Christmas. Photo: Pól Ó Conghaile
Rockefeller Center at holiday season... Photo: Julienne Schaer / NYC & Company
Radio City Music Hall. Photo: Joe Buglewicz/ NYC & Company
Pól Ó Conghaile soaks up Central Park in the snow...
Macy's of New York at Christmas.
Bloomingdale's, Upper East Side, Manhattan. Photo: Julienne Schaer/
Times Square, New York
Rush hour traffic in New York City
Central Park covered in snow. Photo: Getty/Ferran Traite Soler
Pól Ó Conghaile

Pól Ó Conghaile

New York is the greatest three-day town on earth. When those days coincide with the holiday season, that's true with bells on.

There's simply nothing like the Big Apple at Christmas. From grown adults giggling on ice-rinks to glittering windows, Broadway shows and (if you're lucky) snow in Central Park, it's a guaranteed mood-lifter.

New Yorkers may grit their teeth and push through the out-of-towners, but even they know that there's magic in the air.

Heck, even the skyscapers look like giant Christmas trees. Feast your eyes on our gallery (above), or get stuck in with these highlights...

The Rink at Rockefeller Center

Rockefeller Center, Manhattan. Photo: Marley White/NYC & Company

• Skating at New York's iconic rink starts from $25/$15. It’s surprisingly small, but brilliantly atmospheric (

• Fancy a splash? A VIP tent ($60pp) has private seating, hot chocolates, cookies and a little bit more instruction on hand if you're into an upgrade.

• I hadn’t skated in ages, but ramped up with a few tips (lean forward, bend the knees, take small steps...) and soon got up and running.

• Don't forget to look up. 'Scrapers soar, Stars & Stripes flutter and the plaza's 30m tree is a beacon in the Big Apple. It's a Norway Spruce trucked in from Pennsylvania, with decorations including a modest 50,000 LED lights...

• The tree has a rich history. During the Great Depression, workers lined up beneath it as the Rockefeller Center was being built, and you may remember it featuring on TV as a focal point for the city in the days after 9/11.

Wow Factor: Window displays

Bloomingdale's Christmas windows, an homage to PT Barnum. Photo: Pól Ó Conghaile

• Department store windows are a holiday tradition in NYC, kicking off after Thanksgiving. People travel from all over the US (and beyond) to put their noses up against the glass… no expense is spared.

• This year, Bloomingdale’s has a display based on PT Barnum’s circus and freak shows (above)… you can take photos of yourself and see them whirl around the windows. It’s a partnership with the movie, The Greatest Showman.

• Macy’s 2017 displays look at holiday traditions, and the family preparations made before the visit of Santa Claus. Don't forget to step inside, either - the world's biggest store offers a 10pc discount if you produce your passport.

• Tiffany & Co. has displays based on its iconic blue box, but the pick of the bunch is Saks Fifth Avenue, where a music and light show illuminates the whole façade of like a Disney fireworks display (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is the theme).

Score with seasonal shopping

Macy's Herald Square, Midtown, Manhattan. Photo: Joe Buglewicz/ NYC & Company

• There are Holiday Markets all over Manhattan – including huts at Columbus Circle, Times Square, and upmarket little booths at the Occulus, the new transport hub near World Trade Center. They're high on atmosphere (and generally, prices).

• FAO Schwarz may be closed, but there’s a pop-up version (including the piano from ‘Big’) at Bergdorf-Goodman until December 31.

• For kids, there’s a 35,000-square-foot Toys R’ Us ‘pop-up’ at Times Square… near to the M&M Store.

• Outlet villages of course offer rich pickings at any time of year – Woodbury Common is an hour from Port Authority by bus ($42 return).

• Next year, a huge new ‘Empire Outlets’ will open on Staten Island, so you can combine a visit with the free ferry and skyline views.

Central Park in the snow

Pól Ó Conghaile soaks up Central Park in the snow...

• Boom! This is an iconic NYC sight; count your lucky stars if you catch it.

• The Wollman rink offers a cheaper (and larger) ice-skating alternative to the Rockefeller Center, with rates from $12/$6 ( 

• Yes, it's touristy, but if you abandon yourself to a carriage ride, the romance soon seeps in. Expect to pay around $55 (+tips) for 20 minutes.

• Central Park is enormous, so don’t try to see it comprehensively on foot. Rent a bike, or grab a pedal-cab and pick your stops – they range from Strawberry Fields (the John Lennon memorial) to Gapstow Bridge and the Central Park Zoo.

• See and for more.

Christmas Shows & Events

Times Square, New York

• The city's perennial Christmas staple is The Nutcracker, performed by NYC Ballet since 1954, at the Lincoln Center. Despite its longevity, the show wasn't an immediate success, but a televised version in 1958 brought the magic into people’s homes... and a classic was born (

• Family shows on Broadway include Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and SpongeBog SquarePants, while 2018 has some big new openings in store. Frozen opens in February; Harry Potter and the Cursed Child debuts in April.

• For same-day discounts, see the TKTS booth ( on Times Square.

Christmas movies in NYC

will ferrel elf.jpg
Will Ferrell says this encounter in Elf was improvised with a random member of the public

• Before you travel, watch a classic. You'll be chomping at the bit.

• If Elf (2003) isn't your No.1 Christmas movie, then you're a cotton-headed ninny muggins. It sees Will Ferrell save the Christmas spirit with adventures in the Empire State Building, Rockefeller rink and Central Park. Elf now plays as a musical at the New York City Theatre (

Miracle on 34th Street (1947) is a Macy’s staple in monochrome. Santa always rides at the end of the Thanksgiving Parade.

Home Alone 2 (1992)... Macaulay Culkin is  New York during Holiday Season. What could possibly go wrong? A young(ish) Donald Trump makes a cameo.

New York Christmas Travel Tips

Macy's of New York at Christmas.

• NYC ain’t cheap. The exchange rate isn't doing the euro any favours as I write (€1=$1.18), there's an 8.875pc sales tax on most purchases, and you need to factor tips of 15-20pc into any meals you eat, taxis you take or services you avail of.

It adds up, so have your budget worked out in advance.

• Don’t underestimate the size of Manhattan – get to grips with the Subway as early as possible, and use a metro card (7 days unlimited travel, $32).

• The CityPASS (; $122) offers a 42pc discount on six of the Big Apple’s biggest attractions, including the Met and 9/11 Memorial & Museum.

• I travelled with American Holidays ( on this trip, staying at the Hotel Metro ( It has winter breaks including flights and three nights in a 3-star hotel from €579pp in January - by my reckoning the cheapest time of year to visit new York.

• More on that here: The cheapest time to visit New York?  January also sees the next New york Restaurant Week (Jan 22 to Feb. 9;

• See for more New York Christmas tips.

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