| 10.2°C Dublin

Plan to unite three of Ireland’s most popular greenways could attract 1.5m walkers and cyclists every year

Waterford and Tipperary councils are now examining proposals to connect the hugely popular Waterford Greenway with the Suir Blueway - while the new Cork Greenway is expected to be opened by late 2022/early 2023

Close

The Waterford Greenway passes under Durrow Viaduct. Picture: Andrea Pistolesi

The Waterford Greenway passes under Durrow Viaduct. Picture: Andrea Pistolesi

The Waterford Greenway passes under Durrow Viaduct. Picture: Andrea Pistolesi

THE south-east aims to become Ireland's rambling capital amid ambitious plans to unite three of the country's most popular greenway walking and cycling routes.

Waterford and Tipperary councils are now examining proposals to connect the hugely popular Waterford Greenway with the Suir Blueway - while the new Cork Greenway is expected to be opened by late 2022/early 2023.

It will also be the focus of discussions as to a future linkage to the Waterford and Tipperary walking routes.

Estimates indicate that a linked walking and cycling route across Cork, Waterford, Tipperary and Wexford could boast more than 1.5 million users each year.

A public consultation has now been launched about linking the Waterford Greenway with the Tipperary/Suir Blueway.

The 46km Waterford route is one of the most successful walking and cycling routes ever developed in Ireland - and has been credited with a massive tourism increase across Waterford.

It is now estimated that more than 250,000 people use the route annually.

Developed along the old Waterford-Dungarvan railway line, it has become enormously popular thanks to its coastal views and attractions including railway tunnels and viaducts as well as its proximity to famous beaches and historic attractions.

Now, Waterford City and County Council are working with Tipperary County Council about linking the Greenway and Blueway routes between Carrick-on-Suir and Kilmeaden.

Travel insider Newsletter

Considering where to go as the world opens up? Indulge your inner traveller with our free newsletter every Wednesday.

This field is required

The public consultation will operate between August 31 and October 7 - and members of the public are encouraged to make submissions, recommendations and comments about the proposal.

Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) have backed the consultation in light of the enormous success of the Waterford Greenway - and the desire to see similar walking and cycling routes expand across Ireland.

Waterford Mayor Councillor John O'Leary said it was a logical step given the success of the Greenway.

"We have seen at first hand the transformative effect that amenities such as the Waterford Greenway can have," he said.

"I am confident that this current proposed project has significant potential to add to the existing Greenway experience and to benefit the communities of Kilmeaden, Portlaw and Carrick-on-Suir, in particular."

Tipperary is also encouraging increased usage of the St Declan's Pilgrim Path, hailed by some as Ireland's Camino de Santiago.

That walking route links Ardmore in west Waterford with Cashel in south Tipperary - and was developed along a path reportedly used by St Declan to go to meet St Patrick.

Cork's Greenway - which links Midleton to Youghal along an old railway line - is currently in its final stages of construction.

It is expected to open shortly.

Waterford and Cork officials have already spoken of the attraction of linking the two Greenway routes.

Wexford is currently developing its own Greenway route which will run from New Ross to Waterford, again along an old railway line.


Most Watched





Privacy