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Limerick Greenway celebrates 500,000 visits as 50km off-road route to Listowel nears

3.5m extra to be spent upgrading facilities and car parks along the Limerick Greenway

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Josh Conway, Eoin Barrett and Clara Galvin from St Molua’s National School on the Limerick Greenway. Photo: Marie Keating

Josh Conway, Eoin Barrett and Clara Galvin from St Molua’s National School on the Limerick Greenway. Photo: Marie Keating

Josh Conway, Eoin Barrett and Clara Galvin from St Molua’s National School on the Limerick Greenway. Photo: Marie Keating

The Limerick Greenway has welcomed over 500,000 visits since reopening last year following a €10 million investment by Limerick City and County Council.

The 40km off-road route currently links the towns of Rathkeale, Newcastle West and Abbeyfeale along the former Limerick-to-Tralee railway line.

Hailed by the Council as the biggest outdoor tourism amenity project it has ever undertaken, the Limerick Greenway will soon connect with the North Kerry Greenway to create a 50km off-road route from Rathkeale to Listowel. 

There are also future plans to extend the greenway from Rathkeale to Adare and onwards to Limerick City.

“A lot has been done to-date and we are delighted to commit further, with additional works in the pipeline that will assist in extending tourism in Limerick beyond its urban centre," said Limerick Mayor, Councillor Daniel Butler. 

A further €3.5m will be spent over 2022 and 2023 on animal crossings, an 80-space car park at Newcastle West, and a new car park and bike hire and toilet facilities at Rathkeale. 

Future greenway hubs are also being planned for Ardagh and Abbeyfeale.

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The original Limerick-to-Tralee railway line opened between 1867 and 1880.

The greenway was upgraded last year at a cost of €10m, with highlights including Victorian features like the Barnagh Tunnel, cast-iron Ferguson’s Viaduct and station houses from the era.

“Already, since its reopening last year, we have seen the amenity linked to the creation of local jobs and the support of local communities,” said Gordon Daly, Director of Service at the Council.

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An aerial view of the Limerick Greenway

An aerial view of the Limerick Greenway

An aerial view of the Limerick Greenway

There have been local concerns, however, that a proposed bypass of Newcastle West will have a negative impact on the greenway, as plans involve constructing two underpasses along the route. 

The Council says the bypass is necessary to improve traffic congestion, and that it will not impact on walkers’ and cyclists’ enjoyment of the greenway.

“We will continue to work to ensure that the impact on the greenway is mitigated as much as possible with the use of measures such as noise barriers, screen planting, landscaping and any other mitigation measures that might be identified during the ongoing design process,” it said. 

Construction of the bypass is “at least four to five years away”, it added.


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