Saturday 20 October 2018

Visiting Dublin? Don't bother with Guinness, Grafton Street or Temple Bar says Condé Nast Traveler

What not to do in Dublin

Dublin's Ha'penny Bridge: Skip the main tourist attractions to spend your visit living like a local, says Condé Nast Traveller.
Dublin's Ha'penny Bridge: Skip the main tourist attractions to spend your visit living like a local, says Condé Nast Traveller.
Temple Bar, Dublin: "You'll be surrounded by crowds of tourists, and will pay twice as much for a pint," says Conde Nast Traveler.
Grafton Street, Dublin
The Full Irish - give it a miss, says Condé Nast Traveler.
Guinness: Conde Nast recommends skipping the hefty Storehouse entrance fees for Dublin's free museums.

Pól ó Conghaile

Condé Nast advises visitors to skip Dublin's "overpriced bus tours" and some of its biggest attractions in a new travel guide.

The online feature, titled 'What not to do in Dublin', advises visitors to avoid Temple Bar and forgo "overpriced" entrance fees for the Guinness Storehouse and Dublin Zoo.

"Don't bother with Grafton Street," is another tip.

Describing the street as Dublin's biggest pedestrian shopping area, Condé Nast says it is lined "with chain stores you'll find in any city and packed with people all day long."

"Regardless of what you do in Dublin, you’ll fall in love with its charm and history," its author says. "But if you stick to all the tourist traps, you’ll risk overlooking the city’s best food, museums and shopping."

grafton.jpg
Grafton Street, Dublin, where crowds of consumers say they are feeling more confident than at any time since 2006

Grafton Street, Dublin

Unsurprisingly, Temple Bar gets a cold dose of reality.

"Temple Bar is one of Dublin’s oldest and most historic neighborhoods, but its most famous establishment, The Temple Bar, isn't where you'll get the most authentic Irish experience," Condé Nast says.

"For starters, you'll be surrounded by crowds of tourists, and will pay twice as much for a pint."

Instead, the author recommends supping a cheaper "and more authentic" pint in nearby Hogan's (South Great George's Street) or Grogan's (on South William Street).

Temple Bar is no stranger to international criticism, of course.

Last year, The Huffington Post advised tourists to avoid the area “at all costs”, listing it as one of the ten most disappointing destinations in the world.

As an alternative, the author suggests exploring the 'Creative Quarter' based around South William Street nearby.

temple bar.jpg
Temple Bar, Dublin: "You'll be surrounded by crowds of tourists, and will pay twice as much for a pint," says Conde Nast Traveler.

Temple Bar - "You'll pay twice as much for a pint"

Dublin has  been the subject of several glowing reviews by heavy-hitting US publications in recent months, including the New York Times.

Last year, Condé Nast ranked Dublin the fifth-friendliest city on earth.

This latest review is more tempered, however, combining humorously critical takes on its most popular tourist experiences with suggested alternatives.

Its author boldly suggests skipping the Full Irish, for example.

"The full Irish breakfast is heavy fare at best and gluttonous at worst," she writes.

"Unless they’re hungover and looking for something to soak up the last night’s pints, locals won’t typically order it, let alone cook it for themselves.

"Tip: Don't dwell too long on the ingredients before taking a bite."

Instead, she recommends trying Irish yoghurt or porridge - "Most restaurants offer it, and you won't need a nap afterwards."

irish breakfast.jpg
The full Irish breakfast

The Full Irish - give it a miss, says Condé Nast

"Overpriced" Hop-on/Hop-off bus tours should also be avoided, according to the guide, which advises visitors to resist forking out entrance fees for famous attractions like the Guinness Storehouse (€18pp) and Dublin Zoo (€16.80pp).

Instead, tourists should take advantage of the city's free museums, including the Chester Beatty Library and IMMA, the author says.

Other, like-a-local tips include making use of Dublin Bikes, taking time to explore the coast and mountains, and skipping bacon and cabbage for modern Irish restaurants like The Pig's Ear and The Winding Stair.

"Dublin is an easy place to blow through your budget fast," Condé Nast says.

Read the full piece here.

Read more:

Six super reasons to fall in love with Dublin all over again… National Geographic makes Kerry a cover star Dublin is 'like walking into a Christmas card' - New York Times Condé Nast ranks Irish hideaway as one of the world's best affordable hotels

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