| 14°C Dublin

Close

Premium

From sleepy seaside town to foodie haven: ‘Tramore was somewhere you went for chips, and now they were queuing for sourdough bread’

Once known for its no-fuss fish ’n’ chips and funfair vibe, this Waterford gem has become a mecca for foodies and families all year round — and people are now flocking there to put down roots

Close

Nicola Crowley and Dvir Nusery of Mezze deli and café, Tramore. Picture: Matthew Photography

Nicola Crowley and Dvir Nusery of Mezze deli and café, Tramore. Picture: Matthew Photography

Mezze in Tramore

Mezze in Tramore

Beach House Tramore

Beach House Tramore

The team at Seagull Bakery, Tramore. Picture: Patrick Browne

The team at Seagull Bakery, Tramore. Picture: Patrick Browne

Jumoke Akintola and Peter Hogan of Beach House Tramore. Picture: Patrick Browne

Jumoke Akintola and Peter Hogan of Beach House Tramore. Picture: Patrick Browne

Nicola Crowley and Dvir Nusery of Mezze. Picture: Matthew Photography

Nicola Crowley and Dvir Nusery of Mezze. Picture: Matthew Photography

Holly Dalton of Conbini Condiments

Holly Dalton of Conbini Condiments

Molly McCann

Molly McCann

/

Nicola Crowley and Dvir Nusery of Mezze deli and café, Tramore. Picture: Matthew Photography

If it’s been a while since you last visited Tramore, it might be time to take another look at the seaside town long associated with bucket-and-spade holidays, old-school amusements and a food offering limited to fish and chips.

Following in the footsteps of its UK equivalents — traditional seaside resorts such as Brighton and Margate — Tramore has become trendy over the past few years, a magnet both for those with pre-existing ties to the town and those with no connection whatsoever, but a wish to base themselves on the coast in a family-friendly location where they might be able to afford to buy a house and put down roots. There are even those who say one of its restaurants is worthy of a Michelin star.


Most Watched





Privacy