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Sleeping in a separate room to your partner is nothing to fear – could it be the key to better sleep?

Victoria Richards


There are plenty of ways to show you love and care for someone – and desire them – without having to put up with them snoring in your ear all night

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Stock image.

Stock image.

Stock image.

What could possibly be more romantic than Paris? The city itself is like a Hallmark card: twinkling lights over the Seine; tiny, cute coffees in pavement cafes; hand-holding along the Champs-Élysées; artists thronging through Montmartre. Yet if Paris (ergo France, to extrapolate: bear with me) is the epicentre of love, why is it that more and more couples there are choosing to sleep apart?

Because that’s what is happening, and it’s causing no small degree of bemusement. Researchers have discovered that 10 per cent of French couples who live together now sleep in different rooms and a further 6 per cent would like to – but are scared of the consequences. The Ifop study found that more than 20 per cent of couples aged 65 and over sleep in separate rooms; but it’s not just older people. Reports suggest young people are increasingly choosing to sleep in separate beds, too.


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