Monday 18 February 2019

Siobhan Byrne: being more mobile is only going to give you a better quality of life

Our fitness expert Siobhan Byrne gives her latest mobility movements in the final instalment of our 'How to thrive' series

11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53. Picture: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan
11/12/18 Fitness expert Siobhan Byrne photographed at Loft53 Pic: Marc O'Sullivan

As we head into week four of our mobility movements, you should be able to start feeling a difference. Like with anything, progress requires consistency and if you have managed to add in some of these movements before your workouts at the gym, or even at home, you will start to notice your mobility changing for the better.

It can be easy to see these progressions in each movement, for example, Y-squats against the wall. You should notice being able to stretch your arms further up the wall than before. There is no need to force, just gradual and controlled movements will help develop your mobility.

Mobility affects so may aspects of your life. While not all pain is derived from lack of mobility, a large proportion is. So when your body has to compensate, somewhere down the line something else will get affected.

Let's take for example, bad hip mobility? Firstly, why do so many people suffer with it? And how will it really affect you in the future?

Well, one thing is for sure, our more sedentary lifestyle has a huge factor to play in hip mobility, especially people who are sitting for long periods of time. It really is a gradual thing, until finally you wake up one day and realise you're not as mobile as you used to be. That simple lack of mobility from too much sitting can have a serious impact on your knees and even your glutes. If your glutes are not working correctly this can cause numerous issues in the lower back and from there it can become a domino effect, leaving it difficult to ascertain where the issue lies.

While mobility may not be the answer to all your aches and pains, it's a good place to start. Remember being more mobile is only going to give you a better quality of life. The more movement and suppleness in joints and limbs will even mean you sleep better.

One thing that's for sure - if your body has to keep compensating and battling an issue, it's simply not going to be working at its optimum.

One of the other major benefits of better mobility is, that when you can move better and you are less restricted, you have endless possibilities of better ability to develop strength and power. Let's be honest, as we get older strength and mobility are key components in us having the best quality of life.

After all being restricted in any aspect of your body will be the one thing that will make you feel older than you are.

Lower body twist & modified version→

Start with your back flat on the floor and your hands by your sides. The head should be resting on the floor and your legs together straight in the air. Slowly lower your legs down towards one side, keeping them as straight as possible, balancing yourself with your arms. Return to start position and repeat on the opposite side. The modified (easier) version: Start with your back flat on the floor and your hands by your sides. The head resting on the floor and your knees bent together resting at your chest. Slowly lower you legs down towards one side, keeping them bent balancing yourself with your arms. Return to start position and repeat on the opposite side.

Back →

 Start by lying on your back. Hands are by your side with your head resting on the ground. The knees should be bent and the calves parallel to the floor. Then simply pull your knees into your chest at the same time lifting your head and back up off the floor. Hold for a few minutes before resting and repeating.

Hamstrings →

Start by sitting straight up with your legs and feet as wide apart as possible. Then simply lean forward facing down pushing your hands out and down. Hold briefly before returning to start position and repeating.

Garland pose→

Start in a squat position with toes pointing out and your back straight facing forward. Place your hands together with your elbows gently pushing against the inside of your leg to deepen the stretch. Hold the pose for a few moments before relaxing then repeating the move.

Clam→

Start by lying on your side on the floor. Knees are bent in 90 degree angle with feet together and your hand supporting your head on your elbow. Simply raise one knee up like a clam, keeping the sides of the feet together before resting down and repeating.

 

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