| 13.7°C Dublin

Close

Premium

XCeed crossover shows need for more chargers to plug gap

 

Close

Sleek design: Kia’s new XCeed plug-in hybrid

Sleek design: Kia’s new XCeed plug-in hybrid

Sleek design: Kia’s new XCeed plug-in hybrid

When I got to the car park in Ballinasloe, both the car-park charging points I could detect off Society Street were occupied. I wasn't in desperate need of power replenishment. I just wanted to fulfil my side of the bargain and charge my Kia XCeed plug-in hybrid at every available opportunity. That is why plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are relevant, after all; they let you travel 35km/45km on cheaper (electric) power than petrol. As I had a lengthy wait, I went for a great walk around the famous town. When I came back there was a charger free.

I've risked boring you with the details of my itinerary to make the point that I was conscious, with the plug-in, that I was not solely reliant on electricity. I still had half a tank of petrol and there were pumps within easy distance.

But what if I had an all-electric car and was down to a few kilometres of range? I know you should never let it get to that, but it has happened me before so I'm justified in citing it as an example. I'd have had to find one somewhere near or wait my turn without the option of going without. Most likely it would have been to wait two hours, as I did with my test car.