Tuesday 23 October 2018

Nissan says car will be able to 'interpret signals' from your brain and take action accordingly in the future

Nissan will show how the technology works at the upcoming CES 2018 trade show in Las Vegas.
Nissan will show how the technology works at the upcoming CES 2018 trade show in Las Vegas.
Eddie Cunningham

Eddie Cunningham

SOON you could be a ‘think driver’.

Car giant Nissan has just unveiled technology which, they say, will make it possible for your car to 'interpret signals’' from your brain and take action accordingly.

It claims its Brain-to-Vehicle technology (known as B2V) will speed up reaction times – from the car - and take stress from those at the wheel.

Nissan will show how the technology works at the upcoming CES 2018 trade show in Las Vegas.

Its executive vice president Daniele Schillaci says: “When most people think about autonomous driving, they have a very impersonal vision of the future, where humans relinquish control to the machines. Yet B2V technology does the opposite, by using signals from their own brain to make the drive even more exciting and enjoyable.”

The breakthrough uses brain decoding technology to predict a driver’s actions - that he/she is going to turn the steering wheel, for example. That in turn triggers assist technologies to begin the action more quickly.

It can also detect if you are under strain or stress and change the driving style when in autonomous mode.

Nissan say other possible outcomes include adjusting the environment in the cabin. They claim their B2V technology is the first system of its kind.

The driver wears a special hi-tech device that measures brain wave activity. This is analysed by autonomous systems and lets them take actions such slowing the car – 0.2 to 0.5 seconds faster than the driver. Such fine margins can often be the difference between a close thing and a collision and would be a major benefit from ‘think driving’.

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