Sunday 18 August 2019

How hands-free calls are a hazard... even five minutes after hanging up, reports study

Research has shown that drivers using hands-free phones fail to notice hazards
Research has shown that drivers using hands-free phones fail to notice hazards
Eddie Cunningham

Eddie Cunningham

It is well worth remembering that 'hands-free' driving does not mean 'brain-free' driving.

Research has found that even when you hang up on a call, an element of distraction can remain for up to five minutes.

But safety experts say safe places to stop and take a call do NOT include the hard shoulder of a motorway

Road safety and breakdown organisation GEM Motoring Assist says all drivers should wait until they are safely parked with the engine off and handbrake on.

Allowing yourself to be distracted while driving - for example by a phone conversation - puts you and those around you at higher risk.

Research has shown that drivers using hands-free phones fail to notice hazards, even those directly in front of them.

They may stop using their mirrors and indicators as they try to reduce their mental workload.

And they also need more space to stop.

Just to reiterate: researchers have found a driver's mental distraction associated with being on a phone call can last up to five minutes after the call has ended.

Remember that the next time the phone rings and you're at the wheel.

Indo Motoring

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