Monday 23 October 2017

Driverless cars coming to four UK locations

A Google self-driving car on display at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California (AP)
A Google self-driving car on display at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California (AP)
Campbell Spray

Campbell Spray

Drivers will be passengers in their own cars by 2030, a British government report predicts. The UK is considering changes to the Highway Code to allow them to be used by the public.

By 2030, the technology is expected to reach a level of safety and sophistication that will allow all drivers to effectively become passengers as cars take over, being able to work, talk to friends or entertain themselves on the internet as they are driven around. In Greenwich, London, self-driving passenger shuttles will be in action, while autonomous Lutz "pods" will be going around public areas in Milton Keynes and Coventry.

The BAE Wildcat, a modified military jeep developed by the aerospace company, will be trialled in Bristol.

Claire Perry, the British Transport Minister, said: "Driverless cars are the future. I want Britain to be at the forefront of this exciting new development, to embrace a technology that could transform our roads and open up a brand new route for global investment."

The UK government is pushing for the country to become a world leader in the technology, which is being spearheaded by Google and some of the biggest vehicle manufacturers in the world. Showing off its prototype at the International CES technology show in Las Vegas last month, BMW demonstrated a new valet service that can summon your car to you by using a smartwatch to "call" it.

Audi's own autonomous car drove itself from San Francisco to the event in Nevada, more than 500 miles away, while Mercedes and other companies are also trialling new cars.

Sunday Independent

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