| 8.4°C Dublin

Close

Premium

A question of spare capacity

A spare wheel in the boot is becoming a rarity - and that can be an issue for drivers, writes Campbell Spray

Close

HELP: VW T-Cross R comes with Europe-wide roadside assistance package

HELP: VW T-Cross R comes with Europe-wide roadside assistance package

HELP: VW T-Cross R comes with Europe-wide roadside assistance package

Last Wednesday, I was stuck in a traffic jam for the first time for months as the commuters going home jammed Dublin's Navan Road. This doesn't bode well for the coming months and the easing of measures tomorrow.

However, this doubling of time for my journey to Phoenix Park to walk Dooey and Ziggy meant I had a lot of time to study the rear of a 2006 Toyota Rav4 and more particularly to reflect on its spare wheel which was mounted behind a metal casing on its back door.

The question of spare wheels and their replacement with, first, space-saver wheels, then just inflation and repair systems has become a very live issue over the last few years. It regularly comes up at car launches - more often from a rural journalist. Also, I get a lot of emails and letters on the subject. It has become more relevant recently as new emission-charging systems affecting more stringently both the price of new cars and road tax bands has made weight saving absolutely critical.