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Tell Eddie: Cold shoulder for the hard shoulder

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Unless it's an emergency - like this car which has engine trouble - it is an offence to stop on the motorway. Photo: Getty Images.

Unless it's an emergency - like this car which has engine trouble - it is an offence to stop on the motorway. Photo: Getty Images.

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Unless it's an emergency - like this car which has engine trouble - it is an offence to stop on the motorway. Photo: Getty Images.

I was surprised that you printed Andrew's letter (Jan 14, Motors) without comment.

The hard shoulder is not there to relieve tailbacks.

Driving on it is a dangerous misuse.

It is intended for pedestrians, broken down vehicles etc.

Overtaking at a road junction is prohibited.

Motorists are perfectly entitled to stop in preparation to making a right turn.

It is the motorist's responsibility to drive at night within the distance they can see to be clear.

Of course the pedestrian could help with brighter clothing, but the onus is on the motorist. Remember the adage "cows don't dip" and drive accordingly.

And finally, motorists should always carry a pair of sunglasses in the glove box. It's as basic as carrying a rug in winter.

- Dick

Eddie,

I'd really like to know why people are putting up with the prices charged for the so-called 'delivery' of a car.

I know you explained recently that there are costs involved in getting a car ready for a customer.

From what I remember you explained that there is a good deal of activity in the time before a car is delivered for the customer to drive away.

The same principle I'm certain applies to a lot of other items we buy as well.

Therefore I am asking why can't dealers give buyers an up-front breakdown of costs?

Bread, tins of beans, fuel all have to be delivered but the cost of doing so it part of the price.

No one quotes you €5 for a bag of fuel and then says 'delivery and related charges are extra' do they?

Isn't it time to end this merry-go-round and just tell customers all the costs involved and how they are arrived at?

That way this ridiculous 'ex-works' pricing (which Eddie you reproduce too) would be banished forever.

Or should we have 'ex-works' and On-The-Road pricing for every car?

That way we would see what the real costs are?

I think it is time something is done.

- Anna

(Readers can let us know here what their feelings on those charges are. I have to say there is an increasing tendency for distributors to give the on-road price or an indication of what the delivery and related charges will be - Eddie)

Eddie,

What is wrong with us when we get a little bit of frost or snow?

It seems like we buy into some sort of panic mode.

The media and weather forecasters do a good job of warning in advance and most main roads are well salted or gritted.

So we should just do the simple things like leaving a bit earlier, driving more slowly, leaving plenty of room between cars - all the sort of advice we hear over and over again. Yet so many seem to forget it all, judging by what I've seen on the few bad days we've had this winter.

- John

Irish Independent