Saturday 16 December 2017

If you’re a woman with a female boss don’t expect to climb the career ladder says research

The likelihood of a woman nabbing a promotion with a female superior is dramatically lower than if their boss were a man.
The likelihood of a woman nabbing a promotion with a female superior is dramatically lower than if their boss were a man.
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Women with female bosses find it more difficult to climb the career ladder than their male counterparts, research has revealed.

The likelihood of a woman nabbing a promotion with a female superior is dramatically lower than if their boss were a man.

The study found that many companies strive to place one female in a managerial role, but after that the chances of another women following her up the ladder are less than half.

The findings were published in the Strategic Management Journal and involved following the career path of women for twenty years from 1991 until 2011.

Associate Professor Cristain Desz said: “Once a company had appointed one woman to a top tier job, the chances of a second woman landing an elite position at the same firm drop substantially, by about 50pc, in fact.

“We thought that the hiring of one woman would lead to a snowball effect at a given company. In fact, what we find is exactly the opposite.

“Once they had appointed one woman, the men seem to have said, “We have done our job”.

“This may be because the men feel that such an appointment already puts them ahead of most companies, which is true.”

The researchers rejected the idea that female bosses suffer from ‘Queen Bee Syndrome’ and are threatened by female rivals.

Companies with a female CEO were more likely to have more than one female manager at the same level, in fact.

The study found that in 2011, females make up just 8.7pc of top managers in companies around the world.

Online Editors

Promoted Links

Life Newsletter

Our digest of the week's juiciest lifestyle titbits.

Promoted Links

Editors Choice

Also in Life