| 19.4°C Dublin

Sprawling red-roofed bungalow in Dublin 18 hits the market at €1.425m

Close

Bangla-dosh: Hillside in Carrickmines.

Bangla-dosh: Hillside in Carrickmines.

Living room with views of the lawned garden.

Living room with views of the lawned garden.

The farmhouse-style kitchen in the property.

The farmhouse-style kitchen in the property.

The dining room with double doors.

The dining room with double doors.

The living room with views of the lawned garden.

The living room with views of the lawned garden.

/

Bangla-dosh: Hillside in Carrickmines.

Imagine you are an extraordinarily posh, British, Victorian, aristocratic, colonial sort.

You are sporting a pith helmet and monocle - sipping gin and quinine whilst swatting mozzies from your handlebar with a horsetail.

Close

The farmhouse-style kitchen in the property.

The farmhouse-style kitchen in the property.

The living room with views of the lawned garden.

The living room with views of the lawned garden.

/

The farmhouse-style kitchen in the property.

You are marching about in the Raj midday sun and reflecting on the native housing stock.

Now imagine how you might sound in your plummiest Harrow drawl when you utter the Hindi word "bangla" - meaning a low-lying thatched house of the sort preferred by native Bengalis (and quite taken to by the colonial Brits).

The word might come out something like this: "bungalow."

And when you return from Blighty to build a home counties version of said low slung banglas with English red roof tiles and bricks, your very impressed friends might just copy it and tell all their friends: "it's a bungalow, you know."

Close

The dining room with double doors.

The dining room with double doors.

The dining room with double doors.

That really is how the word came into being.

Ireland's first true banglas (Dubliners say it in original form) are believed to have been introduced in the early 1900s in Foxrock by the architect Richard Orpen - the less famous, but equally intrepid older sibling of the great painter William Orpen.

The Blackrock-bred Orpen is credited in a 1904 edition of the Irish Builder magazine as being "the originator of the bungalow in Ireland," and responsible for "quite a colony of pretty red-tiled gabled houses in the fashionable residential district of Foxrock."

And once Orpen brought us the British/Bengali cross, we Irish fell in love with it and crossed it again with our native rural cottages to produce our own peculiar mongrel.

Hence the dictionary definition of a "bungalow" today is decidedly non-conclusive, given that every nationality seems to have had a go at it and come up with their own version.

What is certain is that the arts and crafts Anglo "bangla/bungalows" of the Victorian and Edwardian eras are a decidedly different animal from your typically modern Irish common or garden variety that characterised the rural blitz from the 1950's on.

Close

Living room with views of the lawned garden.

Living room with views of the lawned garden.

Living room with views of the lawned garden.

This is confirmed when we look at Hillside, a vast and ornate Orpen-designed home at Carrickmines and just a short walk from the designer's Foxrock bangla/bungalow colony.

This sprawling red-roofed affair is straight from a chocolate box watercolour and it comes with an equally home counties-looking mews and an acre of garden to boot.

Close

Bangla-dosh: Hillside in Carrickmines.

Bangla-dosh: Hillside in Carrickmines.

Bangla-dosh: Hillside in Carrickmines.

At 4,345 sq ft, it is almost four times the size of an average city semi while the mews add an additional 1,600 sq ft.

A crafted reception hall leads to a drawing room sporting a fireplace with a carved wood surround, three decorative niches and French doors to the sun terrace. The sitting room has a built-in bookcase and a fireplace with a wood mantel and cast iron inset.

The dining room also has double doors to the courtyard and the small study has plenty more book shelves. There's a rustic farmhouse-style kitchen and breakfast room and an old butler's pantry.

Chamber

Upstairs the house has five bedrooms, many of them under the angle of the low slung but high-topped roof. The master chamber comes with a balcony looking across the gardens and the courtyard below.

There are three other double rooms, a single room, two bathrooms and a shower room.

Outside there is an open plan ground floor with three bedrooms and a shower room upstairs. It would be ideal for running a good sized business from home or to house elderly parents or independent minded teens or young adults who won't quite fly the family nest. The garden, laid out in lawn and colourful borders has a sun patio and a built-in barbeque.

The views look to Three Rock Mountain and the local Carrickmines tennis club is located across the road. This house also has its own garage and parking for several cars.

Hillside, Upr Glenamuck Road, Dublin 18

Asking Price: AMV of €1.425m

Agent: Ganly Walters (01-6623255)

Ganly Walters auctions Hillview on October 8. Meantime see if you can figure out what the pith heads did to the Hindi word "Kadi".

Indo Property