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No 6 Ailesbury Way has five bedrooms over three floors in a gated scheme

No 6 Ailesbury Way has five bedrooms over three floors in a gated scheme

The modern fitted contemporary kitchen/breakfast room

The modern fitted contemporary kitchen/breakfast room

Ailesbury dining room

Ailesbury dining room

One of the reception rooms

One of the reception rooms

The sunroom of the Ailesbury property

The sunroom of the Ailesbury property

The extra large living room with red brick fireplace

The extra large living room with red brick fireplace

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No 6 Ailesbury Way has five bedrooms over three floors in a gated scheme

During the property boom we witnessed an orgy of conspicuous spending on Ireland's two most exclusive streets - Ailesbury Road and Shrewsbury Road - which culminated in the heady €58m paid for a rather elegant but otherwise run down and nondescript house. Walford on Shrewsbury Road still holds the title of the highest amount paid for an Irish home.

In the high spending years, a who's who of Irish business fought one another at highly publicised auction bouts for the deeds to a luxury pile here and 'plain homes' sold regularly for more than €10m in the streets most popular with foreign embassies and consulates - there are more located on these two streets than in any other part of Dublin. It soon became clear you hadn't 'arrived' in Ireland unless you owned one.

The country's property crash started in Ailesbury/Shrewsbury after the Easter auctions of 2006 when a clutch of homes failed to make their asking prices. By 2010 these two streets had shed €1bn in property value.

And the market recovery also began on these streets in 2011 after opportunist bottom feeders swooped in to acquire a series of homes there offered for sale through Nama and the banks.

But at no point did these houses ever fall below the €1m mark - the lowest point was €1.1m paid for No 10 Ailesbury Road.

After a spate of sales in 2010 and 2011 on the bottom of the market, little has sold here since - the most recent sale was €6.5m paid for No 2 Shrewsbury Road in early 2014.

Since then a practice which seems to be becoming more common here is company purchases - to protect the identities of the owners. Walford was bought for €14m by the mysterious Yesneb Holdings which is looking to extend the property in a big way while No 2 Shrewsbury Road was bought by Spirithill Nominees which is now looking to extend the existing 6,500 sq ft to a whopping 21,000 sq ft - or almost 20 times the size of an average semi detached.

Those heads of industry who held their money during the downturn are now consolidating a new hold on Shrewsbury/Ailesbury.

So why do the super wealthy fall over one another to locate here?

Firstly, the location - Dublin 4 is the height of Dublin posh and it's also extremely convenient for the city centre office district in neighbouring Dublin 2.

Next up is the mix of property. Period homes have always held a premium but the type preferred by modern families is the late Victorian and the Edwardian.

Aside from the attractive red-brick and expert cornicing and hand-crafted joinery and detail from a bygone era, there are more detached homes, and the layouts are more family friendly than their three or four storey over-basement predecessors.

The sites are large and the rear gardens are well secured and private. And because there are few more modest homes on these roads, strangers stand out. That's essentially the cache of a Dublin 4 address in and around Shrewsbury/Ailesbury.

A modern (1990 built) home at 6 Ailesbury Way is located in a horse shoe shaped cul-de-sac located off Ailesbury Road. The style of construction in red-brick means these could, at a pinch, be mistaken for builds dating from the 1930s or 1940s. Located in a gated scheme, it's actually even more private than its Ailesbury Road neighbours.

The detached house has five bedrooms - or four and a study - and is laid out over three floors.

There's a substantial reception hall, a dining room, a modern fitted contemporary kitchen/breakfast room, a sunroom on the ground floor along with a secure double garage.

At first floor level, there's an extra large living room with raised views, a study and bedroom with full ensuite. Upstairs on the second floor, there are three more bedrooms.

There are two additional bathrooms to service the other bedrooms and the overall accommodation tally is almost 3,000 sq ft.

Special features include a set of double doors with stained glass panels through to the formal dining room, ceiling coving and a centre rose and granite worktops in the kitchen. Set within high granite walls, electronic entrance gates open to a cobble lock driveway. The house also comes with richly coloured and polished mahogany floors.

Number 6 is located within easy walking distance of Sydney Parade Dart station, Sandymount Strand and St Vincent's Hospital.

This gated cluster of like-looking homes was built between Rockville House, at the junction of Sydney Park Avenue and Ailesbury Road, and the Merrion Court apartment complex on the corner with Merrion Road in 1990 when developers were only beginning to realise just how much cash they could make from chopped off excess garden sites in the embassy belt.

Agents Sherry FitzGerald (01) 2698888 seek offers in the region of €1.8m.

Indo Property


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