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Clean lines: A master bedroom that spans the full width of the house and has views over the sea

This Dun Laoghaire restoration mixes both old and new by the seaside, writes Allison Gill

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The dining room

The dining room

The back garden with a sandstone patio and fake grass lawn

The back garden with a sandstone patio and fake grass lawn

The family room with doors to the garden

The family room with doors to the garden

The entrance hall

The entrance hall

The entrance hall

The entrance hall

The drawing room leads through an arch to the formal dining room

The drawing room leads through an arch to the formal dining room

The family bathroom with a cast-iron chimney piece

The family bathroom with a cast-iron chimney piece

The exterior of No42

The exterior of No42

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The dining room

Royal Terrace and Clarinda and Crosthwaite Parks date back to the 1850s when architect John Skipton Mulvany was putting his mark on Dun Laoghaire with the design of the railway station and the Royal Irish Yacht Club. It was one of Ireland's fastest-growing towns at the time thanks to the train line and the busy harbour. A couple of royal visits and the presence of some pleasure boats in the harbour added to the image of a town that was full of grandeur and affluence.

As soon as the train rolled into town in 1834, Dun Laoghaire, or Kingstown as it was then known, came to life as a seaside playground for the rich and famous. Bankers and politicians, as well as doctors and artists decided that they did like to be beside the seaside in their downtime and so began the development of the small town.


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