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History in the making - old ways are best if you want to renovate stone buildings

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BEFORE: an old stone coach house renovation by de Blacam and Meagher

BEFORE: an old stone coach house renovation by de Blacam and Meagher

AFTER: An old stone coach house renovation by de Blacam and Meagher; lime render allows the walls to breathe.

AFTER: An old stone coach house renovation by de Blacam and Meagher; lime render allows the walls to breathe.

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BEFORE: an old stone coach house renovation by de Blacam and Meagher

Query: As a result of the pandemic, I'm thinking of converting an existing old outhouse on my farm to make an extra space for self-isolation. The property is stone-built and approximately 41sqm, with a slate roof, needing repair. What should I think about in converting an old building into a self-contained apartment?

Answer: There are wonderfully simple fundamentals to follow when working on historic buildings. The same international principles and guidelines cover all types of work, from a tiny thatched cottage in Connemara to City Hall in Dublin or the Colosseum in Rome.

In proposing to change the use of your stone outhouse, regardless of whether it is a protected structure or not, a guiding principle is 'as little work as possible and as much work as necessary'. A protected structure is one a planning authority considers to be of special interest from an architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social or technical point of view.


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