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Youth boost or money down the vein? Our reporter investigates IV vitamin therapy

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Journalist Kate Demolder receiving a multi-vitamin drip from nurse Dee Howleyat Get A Drip clinic in Castleknock, Co Dublin

Journalist Kate Demolder receiving a multi-vitamin drip from nurse Dee Howleyat Get A Drip clinic in Castleknock, Co Dublin

Nurse Dee Howley preparing to cannulate journalist Kate Demolder

Nurse Dee Howley preparing to cannulate journalist Kate Demolder

Nurse Dee Howley preparing to Cannulate journalist Kate Demolder. Pic:Mark Condren

Nurse Dee Howley preparing to Cannulate journalist Kate Demolder. Pic:Mark Condren

Journalist Kate Demolder receiving a multi vitamin drip at Get A Drip clinic in Castleknock. Pic:Mark Condren 6.7.2021

Journalist Kate Demolder receiving a multi vitamin drip at Get A Drip clinic in Castleknock. Pic:Mark Condren 6.7.2021

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Journalist Kate Demolder receiving a multi-vitamin drip from nurse Dee Howleyat Get A Drip clinic in Castleknock, Co Dublin

You could argue that scepticism is built into Irish DNA. For a nation of talkers, disparaging comments come easily, especially when the topic of health comes to the fore. I would generally fall into quite a sceptical camp — by both nature and nurture — but one which, thankfully, finds me pleasantly surprised more often than not. One such time was my recent visit to Get A Drip, a clinic offering vitamins and ‘nutrient therapy’ delivered by intravenous drip.

Buzz about these drips has been building since 2008, when Tokyo clinic Tenteki 10 first began offering a 10-minute drip, where, for just €15, Japan’s famously diligent business people could get a quick fix before returning to the office.


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