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The Women’s Mini Marathon: a simple idea that would become an Irish phenomenon

From its humble roots in 1983, the Women’s Mini Marathon has grown into a massive cultural event

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A group of ‘convicts released from the kitchen sink’ in 1998

A group of ‘convicts released from the kitchen sink’ in 1998

Martina Hand will be carrying a picture of her late mum Betty, a Women’s Mini Marathon stalwart. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Martina Hand will be carrying a picture of her late mum Betty, a Women’s Mini Marathon stalwart. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Paralympian Patrice Dockery says she always tried to fit the WMM into her race schedule

Paralympian Patrice Dockery says she always tried to fit the WMM into her race schedule

Rosemary Kunene first ran in 2019 when she was living in direct provision. Photo: Paul McCarthy

Rosemary Kunene first ran in 2019 when she was living in direct provision. Photo: Paul McCarthy

Trish Horgan was on the start line in 1983 for the first Women’s Mini Marathon. Photo: Frank McGrath

Trish Horgan was on the start line in 1983 for the first Women’s Mini Marathon. Photo: Frank McGrath

The start line for the 1999 Women's Mini Marathon

The start line for the 1999 Women's Mini Marathon

Marianne Carter, Michelle Joyce, Ingrid Waterhouse, Anita Savage, Catherine Chaney and Glenda Curtis in 2019. Photo: Gerry Mooney

Marianne Carter, Michelle Joyce, Ingrid Waterhouse, Anita Savage, Catherine Chaney and Glenda Curtis in 2019. Photo: Gerry Mooney

Betty Brady, age 81, at the 2018 Women’s Mini Marathon. Photo: Arthur Carron

Betty Brady, age 81, at the 2018 Women’s Mini Marathon. Photo: Arthur Carron

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A group of ‘convicts released from the kitchen sink’ in 1998

IT’S the biggest women’s event of its kind anywhere in the world. An annual 10k road race which started in 1983, the Women’s Mini Marathon (WMM) has grown to a 40,000-strong sea of women taking to the streets of Dublin each year.

Marking 40 years this year, the Vhi WMM has seen more than one million women pound the pavements of Dublin, raising in excess of €225m for charities on their way.


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