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How to process your pandemic trauma: A PTSD expert, psychologist, life coach, yogi and trauma survivor give their advice

As we emerge from the depths of the global Covid-19 crisis, only now do we have the chance to look back and realise the enormity of what we’ve been through — and how deeply it has affected each of us. So how can we work through it?

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"Whether people have caught the virus or not, it’s frightening and our sense of real life and its rhythms have been disrupted.”

"Whether people have caught the virus or not, it’s frightening and our sense of real life and its rhythms have been disrupted.”

“It’s like a boat on an ocean, on the surface there could be storms but the deeper you go, the more still it gets.”

“It’s like a boat on an ocean, on the surface there could be storms but the deeper you go, the more still it gets.”

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"Whether people have caught the virus or not, it’s frightening and our sense of real life and its rhythms have been disrupted.”

Every now and again, an event such as the birth of a child or the death of a loved one blindsides us, altering the state of our being and how we live our lives — but rarely is there one that affects us collectively. The coronavirus pandemic has been a global trauma, we have been ‘in it together’, so to speak. Everyone has a personal ‘before’ and ‘after’ and has been affected in some way by the virus; we can all relate to each other.

But each of us has also been affected in a personal way and we must find our own way to navigate out of the crisis. In the 18 months since the pandemic darkened our shores, more than 4.7 million have died globally, economies have been flattened, people have lost their jobs, been locked inside their homes, missing funerals and cancelling weddings.


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