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Feeling the Sunday night fear? There is a simple way to get rid of it, according to this Irish expert

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Activities that help the limbic part of the brain, responsible for emotion and anxiety, help switch off and engage other parts of our mind.

Activities that help the limbic part of the brain, responsible for emotion and anxiety, help switch off and engage other parts of our mind.

Activities that help the limbic part of the brain, responsible for emotion and anxiety, help switch off and engage other parts of our mind.

A dose of the fear of a Sunday is something we've all felt, particularly after a heavy weekend or facing the office after a blissful sun holiday.

Some of us, however, consistently experience intense feelings of anxiety in anticipation of the week ahead which can often be like a dark cloud over our peaceful Sunday.

According to mental conditioning and resilence expert Gerry Hussey, there are a number of ways to battle the common feeling of anxiety and to make the most of the present moment.

"Our mind is this floating thing that seems to always go to places that we don’t want it to be," said Hussey, speaking at INM event series Ireland's Fittest Company.

"I think on a Sunday evening you should be really mindful that it is Sunday and 12 hours away from the next day and 12 hours is a long time.

"The first thing I would suggest is to develop some simple tools and techniques about how to be more mindful, to be more aware of what’s going on around you, to stop that little monkey mind from running into places that you don’t want it to be."

For those regularly suffering from Sunday night anxiety, the performance consultant advises activities that help the limbic part of the brain, responsible for emotion and anxiety, switch off and engage other parts of our mind.

"Our brain has this part called the limbic brain or we call it the chimp. The limbic brain is the emotional centre that’s based in fight or flight. It wants to make real fast decisions and it wants to make lots of decisions. What it doesn’t want to do is to stop and think about things. It doesn’t want to be present.

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Some of us consistently experience intense feelings of anxiety in anticipation of the week ahead

Some of us consistently experience intense feelings of anxiety in anticipation of the week ahead

Some of us consistently experience intense feelings of anxiety in anticipation of the week ahead

"What we need to do is go for a nice walk, do some physical exercise. This allows you to get out of the limbic brain and switch on the other parts. Even things like journaling, painting or doing some gardening switches off the limbic brain and switches on the prefrontal cortex which gives you a total different sensation," says Hussey.

While there are techniques to reduce the symptoms of anxiety ahead of a busy week, Hussey said they are often just a short term solution. The expert says those who are consistently battling 'the fear' need to look at the bigger picture.

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"Another thing I would say about the Sunday night dread... we can treat the symptoms. But the problem is that you’re probably in the wrong job.

"The long term solution to the Sunday night dread is to ask yourself, ‘Why do I dread the job’, ‘Why am I so anxious about going into it’.

"'If I really loved the job, would I feel like this?'

"If you consistently feel like on a Sunday night you’re dreading going into work, I think the bigger question you need to ask is 'What would it feel like, if on a Monday, I went into a job that I loved?'

"You have the short-term solution, but then you have the long-term solution. That is the case with all anxiety and stress. It’s about asking yourself how you can treat the immediate symptoms, but also ask what’s actually behind this," he said.

For more information on Ireland's Fittest Company visit: www.irelandsfittestcompany.ie


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