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Fit summer week three: Foods with a bad rap that are actually good for you

Dietitian Orla Walsh on how the diet industry has complicated the simple act of eating  – and what you really need to know to eat well 

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Orla Walsh busts the myths on some foods that we are usually told are bad for us. Photo: Gerry Mooney.

Orla Walsh busts the myths on some foods that we are usually told are bad for us. Photo: Gerry Mooney.

Bananas are a great source of potassium

Bananas are a great source of potassium

Many of us need to increase our veg intake

Many of us need to increase our veg intake

Bread doesn't deserve the bad rep it gets

Bread doesn't deserve the bad rep it gets

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Orla Walsh busts the myths on some foods that we are usually told are bad for us. Photo: Gerry Mooney.

The diet industry has cashed in on our health fears. We’re told about the health consequences for our body and then offered a ‘quick solution’ that comes at a price. It promises dramatic weight loss, that’s easy and permanent. Research doesn’t back that. In fact, you don’t have to lose weight to gain health. You can become healthier without losing a pound. Health is not a size. It’s not a look. You can’t look at someone and know definitely if they’re healthy.

What’s more, because of diet culture, the answer to ‘what is a healthy diet?’ can sometimes be confusing for people. It’s understandable. The diet industry has pushed low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets, followed by high-protein low-carbohydrate diets and more recently high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets. It makes something relatively straight forward appear complicated.


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