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Women shouldn't ignore their father's medical history

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What is often not known and is important to remember is that an inherited predisposition to cancer, (such as a BRCA gene alteration) can be passed down from your father's side of the family as easily as your mother's side.

What is often not known and is important to remember is that an inherited predisposition to cancer, (such as a BRCA gene alteration) can be passed down from your father's side of the family as easily as your mother's side.

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What is often not known and is important to remember is that an inherited predisposition to cancer, (such as a BRCA gene alteration) can be passed down from your father's side of the family as easily as your mother's side.

Around one in 70 women will get ovarian cancer in their lifetime - and for most women with a family history of the disease, their risk will not be much higher than that of the rest of the population.

Nearly 380 Irish women are newly diagnosed with the cancer annually. If a woman has a first-degree relative with ovarian cancer such as a mother, sister or daughter, then the risk may increase to around one in 20.

What is often not known and is important to remember is that an inherited predisposition to cancer, (such as a BRCA gene alteration) can be passed down from your father's side of the family as easily as your mother's side. Therefore women shouldn't ignore a family history of cancer on their father's side.

Recent evidence has suggested that premenopausal women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (which is different to just having polycystic ovaries) may have a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer

Taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT), having endometriosis, being overweight or smoking slightly increase risk

Around one in 70 women will get ovarian cancer in their lifetime - and for most women with a family history of the disease, their risk will not be much higher than that of the rest of the population.

Nearly 380 Irish women are newly diagnosed with the cancer annually. If a woman has a first-degree relative with ovarian cancer such as a mother, sister or daughter, then the risk may increase to around one in 20.

What is often not known and is important to remember is that an inherited predisposition to cancer, (such as a BRCA gene alteration) can be passed down from your father's side of the family as easily as your mother's side. Therefore women shouldn't ignore a family history of cancer on their father's side.

Recent evidence has suggested that premenopausal women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (which is different to just having polycystic ovaries) may have a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer

Taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT), having endometriosis, being overweight or smoking slightly increase risk.

Online Editors


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