Friday 20 July 2018

'I was just broken inside' - young woman tells how she attempted suicide 'more than 15 times' because she was bullied

Stacey Dineen said she attempted suicide more than 15 times because of the bullying she suffered at school.
Stacey Dineen said she attempted suicide more than 15 times because of the bullying she suffered at school.
Geraldine Gittens

Geraldine Gittens

Three young women shared their experiences around body image last night on the Late Late Show.

Tia Duffy, Sarah Tyrrell and Stacey Dineen discussed the body positivity movement with host Ryan Tubridy.

Stacey described the bullying she suffered at school and how she attempted suicide more than 15 times.

 “I went into primary school and I was still the fat girl. I had a few friends but those friends, they wouldn’t want to hang around with me because I was the fat girl.”

“I got into sixth class and I kind of started hating myself. I used to get uniforms that were baggier, I used to try and starve myself to try and lose weight.”

“I went into secondary school and I was in first year, and I was like, this isn’t actually that bad. Everybody was being kind, everybody was nice, but that didn’t last very long.”

However, when Stacey began her second year at secondary school, she became a victim of bullying.

“I got into second year and people were just taking little pieces out of me, and then they took so much out of me that I just went into a black hole. I couldn’t pick it up. I was just broken inside.”

Tia Duffy, Sarah Tyrrell and Stacey Dineen discussed the body positivity movement with host Ryan Tubridy.
Tia Duffy, Sarah Tyrrell and Stacey Dineen discussed the body positivity movement with host Ryan Tubridy.

“I was that girl that you saw in school… I was smiling in the hall… but then I was going home and trying to cut my wrists because I just did not want to be here.”

“That’s not my fault. It’s other people’s fault, because they didn’t accept me for who I was.”

Stacey said she feels she now can make a different by speaking publicly about her experiences.

“I was a happy girl, you can’t put a face on depression because I was the happy girl… I was the go-to person [to help people].”

“I attempted suicide definitely more than 15 times, and I failed every time, and I failed for a reason. I’m here today.”

Meanwhile, Sarah spoke about why she is now comfortable with the word “fat” but would never describe another person as such.

Sarah Tyrrell spoke about why she is now comfortable with the word “fat” but would never describe another person as such.
Sarah Tyrrell spoke about why she is now comfortable with the word “fat” but would never describe another person as such.

“I quite like the word fat, probably because 80pc of my personality is made up of wanting to shock people, but also because I think there’s something really empowering about taking a word that’s been used against you your whole life, like a knife in your stomach.”

“Nothing has hurt me more than that word has, and so for me to take that and to turn it around and turn it into a positive thing: ‘Yes I‘m fat, I’m white, I’m tall, I’m blonde’…  All of these words have the exact same implications to me, that’s empowering.”

She added: “I would never describe another individual as fat…  not unless I’d heard them do it themselves, just because I’ve decided to take it on doesn’t mean that that word doesn’t still hurt the other person.”

“But I do like to talk about fat people as a group.”

Model Tia Duffy said she believes being overweight doesn’t equate to unhealthiness.

“If you go to a doctor, and you look overweight, you could be healthy… I’m doing a Nike campaign coming up, and it’s all different shapes and sizes, and all of the models that I’m using in that campaign are fit, but they’re all different sizes. But there’s no way on earth that you could tell me they’re not fit… they’re not unhealthy.”

“This whole thing about trying to judge somebody just by looking at them, I’m not buying it unless it’s coming from a medical doctor… “

She is currently researching the topic for an academic project, she told Tubridy.

“My project is an academic project and I’ve spoken to hundreds of different people and doctors will tell me all the time, you know, you can’t just judge somebody just by looking at their body.”

Anyone affected by issues raised in this article can contact Samaritans on 116 123 or Pieta House on 1800 247 247

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