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I was 49 and I thought I was going through menopause - it was a brain tumour

This week is Brain Tumour Awareness week. Hat maker Lina Stein tells us about her experience of diagnosis and recovery from a brain tumour and how it has inspired her work

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Lina Stein, who suffered a brain tumour five years ago, at the launch of Brain Tumour Awareness Week. Photo: Marc O'Sullivan.

Lina Stein, who suffered a brain tumour five years ago, at the launch of Brain Tumour Awareness Week. Photo: Marc O'Sullivan.

‘Hats Off Hero’ Kim Heatley, Brain Tumour Awareness Week milliner partner Lina Stein and Brain Tumour Ireland national coordinator Fiona Keegan

‘Hats Off Hero’ Kim Heatley, Brain Tumour Awareness Week milliner partner Lina Stein and Brain Tumour Ireland national coordinator Fiona Keegan

Lina with some of her hats

Lina with some of her hats

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Lina Stein, who suffered a brain tumour five years ago, at the launch of Brain Tumour Awareness Week. Photo: Marc O'Sullivan.

Brain tumours are not something we generally think about until they are diagnosed — then we can’t think about anything else. Around 400 people in Ireland are diagnosed with a brain tumour each year, of which there are 120 different types and carry a startling array of names — astrocytomas, craniopharyngioma, medulloblastoma, subependymoma.

Five years ago, hat maker Lina Stein — originally from Sydney and now a long-term resident of Westport, Co Mayo — suffered from a brain tumour called a meningioma. She made a full recovery and is now involved in Brain Tumour Awareness Week (October 30 to November 6) which includes the annual Wear A Hat Day national fundraiser on November 5.


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