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‘I had a very unhealthy relationship with my body. If I didn't train six days a week, I would beat myself up. I would see the fat and feel so ashamed.’

From depression and heavy drinking to addictions to food and exercise, ultra runner Adam Henderson tells how he pulled himself from the brink of suicide and finally learned to love himself and embrace life

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Ultra runner Adam Henderson from Templeogue, Dublin. Photo by Steve Humphreys

Ultra runner Adam Henderson from Templeogue, Dublin. Photo by Steve Humphreys

Ultra runner Adam Henderson from Templeogue, Dublin. Photo by Steve Humphreys

For architect-turned-propmaker Adam Henderson, the finish line of the 2019 New York Marathon was the end of a much longer journey. As he took in the view at Central Park, he began to cry. First a few tears. And then, a flood.

It was like I had finally achieved what I’d set out to do. Six years ago, I was just the guy knowing I had to do something. Now I’m crossing the finish line in Central Park. I just felt this huge feeling of pride, of happiness. It felt like six years of my life flashed in front of me.”

Adam had been diagnosed with depression at 16. This led to a vicious circle of drinking, to weight gain, to depression with no end.


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