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‘Anti-fat bias, not fatness itself, may be a fat person’s greatest health risk’

Fat-shaming is part of our culture and overweight people are bombarded by the narrative that they need to be thin in order to be accepted, says US writer Aubrey Gordon – aka Twitter phenomenon ‘Your Fat Friend’, in her new book

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An illustration from Your Fat Friend profile

An illustration from Your Fat Friend profile

An illustration from Your Fat Friend profile

Why is anti-fat bias still okay? Why, when we disapprove of and legislate against discriminatory behaviour towards other social groups, does fattism and fatphobia continue to get worse? Why does it remain acceptable to treat fat people differently — that is, negatively, dismissively, judgementally — from straight-sized people?

From “you’re going to die” and “no-one will love you at your size” to “have you tried paleo /keto/Overeaters Anonymous/do you work out/were you abused as a child?”, fat people have to contend with all kinds of unsolicited intrusion and interrogation. Some of it is well meaning, but a lot of it is just downright mean. And guess what — it doesn’t help. If it did, nobody would be fat.


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