Friday 17 August 2018

Harry Potter normalises the dark side for children - Ireland's only hermit priest

Daniel Radcliffe (R) stars as Harry Potter as he watches as Professor Dumbledore, portrayed by the late Richard Harris, feed Fawkes the Phoenix
Daniel Radcliffe (R) stars as Harry Potter as he watches as Professor Dumbledore, portrayed by the late Richard Harris, feed Fawkes the Phoenix

Louise Walsh

Ireland's only hermit priest has warned of the dangers of Harry Potter and video games, which he says expose children to the 'dark side.'

Fr David Jones (64) has also urged users of Reiki to be careful, saying that by opening up pores and shakras to positive energy, the negative spirits can also get in.

The Welsh native, who has lived in Duleek, Co. Meath for over ten years believes that video games and even Harry Potter are part of a bigger agenda 'to normalise the dark side."

"Evil that can come out of a screen is deliberate and pumped at people who are defenceless, such as children.  Video games and screens and damaging children and hugely exposing them to evil," he said.

"It's murky and affects every layer of society.

"Old Nick is not short of measures of getting in there.  Little children watching Harry Potter are learning real spells and being told that vampires, the ugly are the good.  it's a topsy turvy system to get them ready for something worse."

Fr David, who lived in monasteries in Italy and France and speaks eight languages, also claims that drug shipments in Latin America are presided over by Satanic rites to ensure maximum destruction.

"Big shipments of drugs are coming out with maximum demonic attachment because they (drug lords) invite someone involved in Satanism to come out and perform a rite of cursing over each shipload to cause maximum harm and therefore they are most lucrative to them.

"Practices such as Reiki also open doors to the dark side because they open the shakras and pores to other energies too."

There's also a surge of Satanic power at Hallowe'en where human sacrifices occur each year, he claims.

"Human sacrifices happen each Hallowe'en and people are conceived in Satanic rites for Satan - every time this happens, there's an increase in Satanic power on earth.  These demons want our souls and they're getting them."

Although Fr David has been present at exorcisms he is not trained to perform them, though admits each diocese has a priest that is.

"I have been in the presence of evil.  Major exorcisms can't be performed without the permission of the Bishop because it's dangerous and it's noisy.  I have been there it it can frighten you, but you mustn't get frightened because you're in control - a demon is a creature so it has to obey Christ in the priest.

"Nothing else will get rid of demons other that the power of the priest.

Although warning about the presence of 'Old Nick,' Fr David admits that Ireland has more of an inherent faith than most countries, and that many young people come to him because they still have faith.

"You can't get away from the faith in Ireland. It's strong by instinct.  If a person is in trouble, they pray.  People tend to go back to base at the most important times

"However Ireland is a no man's land at the minute - it's neither what it once was or what it will be."

His weekly Latin Mass in Navan is attended by people from all over the country and even people home from abroad on holidays.

"People are drifting back to this Mass because they've been upset by the abuses of the church and looking for something that's nourishing and not superficial," he said.

A convert to Catholicism from a one-time calling to be a Baptist minister, Fr David came to Ireland under the permission of Bishop Michael Smith of the Diocese of Meath, who he says has protected him as a hermit.

"Under Canon law, to be a hermit you must have a degree of separation, a commitment to penance, continuous prayer and no parish ministry  and permission from your Bishop."

He rises at 3.15am to start praying and fasts until lunchtime, a menu which he gets from divine providence.

"I eat simply but sufficiently and never have to buy food, it arrives when needed, out of the blue from kind parishoners.

"I have very little sleep, no breakfast, no TV and very limited internet - it's pretty stark and austere, if I'm honest."

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