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Why it’s time to rethink your attitude to Bag-in-Box wines

Wine on tap or in cans is a great for summer and has many advantages over traditional glass packaging

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Wine sold in bags has come a long way since its 'cheaper' beginnings

Wine sold in bags has come a long way since its 'cheaper' beginnings

Ramona Amarino Spritz

Ramona Amarino Spritz

Symington Family Estates Altano Rewilding Edition Douro 2019

Symington Family Estates Altano Rewilding Edition Douro 2019

Hans Baer Secco Rosé

Hans Baer Secco Rosé

Atlana Rewilding Red

Atlana Rewilding Red

Domaine l’Hortus Le Loup dans la Bergerie Rosé

Domaine l’Hortus Le Loup dans la Bergerie Rosé

Colutta Pinot Grigio 2020

Colutta Pinot Grigio 2020

Symington Family Estates Altano Rewilding Edition Douro 2019

Symington Family Estates Altano Rewilding Edition Douro 2019

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Wine sold in bags has come a long way since its 'cheaper' beginnings

As households decamp to holiday homes and campsites, and music-festival season moves into full throttle, it’s a great time to reconsider your attitude to non-glass wine packaging like Bag-in-Box (Bib) and cans. Maybe you’re one of the growing cohort of confident wine consumers who know that great wine now comes in many formats. Maybe you’re a regular reader of this column and have tried my previous recommendations from Winelab, which, besides supplying wine on tap to savvy Irish restaurants, also sells juicy red Bib wine from California’s Folk Machine (€65, 3l), pouches of highly quaffable Italian Un’Ombra wines (€25, 1.5l), and cans of the sassy sommelier-created spritz range from Ramona (€15, 4 x 250ml cans).

It’s also possible that you may have lingering doubts about drinking quality wine from a plastic (polyethylene) bag. After all, in Australia, where the packaging was developed, it contained the cheapest of wines, and many of us still associate it with quaffing very rustic, local wines on continental camping or gîtes holidays.


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