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East meets West - fusing Asian tradition with Irish tastes


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Hong Kong-style Char Sui BBQ Ribs With Five Spice & Ginger. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Hong Kong-style Char Sui BBQ Ribs With Five Spice & Ginger. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

King Prawn Potsticker Dumplings. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

King Prawn Potsticker Dumplings. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Kwanghi Chan, photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Kwanghi Chan, photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Broccoli, Fermented Black Bean & Peas With Sichuan Peppercorns. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann 

Broccoli, Fermented Black Bean & Peas With Sichuan Peppercorns. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann 

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Hong Kong-style Char Sui BBQ Ribs With Five Spice & Ginger. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Born in Hong Kong and raised in Donegal, chef Kwanghi Chan from Bowls restaurant in Dublin draws on his heritage to fuse Asian tradition with modern Irish tastes.

Hong Kong-style Char Sui BBQ Ribs With Five Spice & Ginger

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

300g hoisin sauce

300g yellow bean paste

2 tbsp sesame oil

5 tbsp soy sauce

5 tbsp XO brandy or dry sherry

5 tbsp honey

20g caster sugar

6 tbsp ginger, chopped

5 tbsp garlic, chopped

2 tbsp ChanChan spice seasoning, available from Lidl, or Five spice powder

3 slabs of baby back pork ribs from your local butcher

Baking/parchment paper or aluminium foil

300g warm water

1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds

Method

1. Mix the hoisin sauce, yellow bean paste, sesame oil, soy sauce, XO brandy or sherry, honey, sugar, ginger, garlic and spice seasoning or spice powder in a shallow bowl until totally combined.

2. Separate half of the marinade sauce into a jug and use later.

3. Put the other half of the marinade into a bowl and add the baby back pork ribs. Put on a pair of kitchen gloves and mix and rub the marinade into the ribs. This will get all the flavour and spice into the meat. Put into the refrigerator for 1-3 hours, or cover and refrigerate overnight for best results.

4. After marinading, preheat oven on medium heat (175°C/ 350°F). Give the ribs a turn so all the marinade is covering the ribs and discard the marinade.

5. Line an oven tray with baking/parchment paper or aluminium foil. Place the pork ribs on the tray and bake for 30 minutes on one side. Rotate the ribs with tongs and brush again with the marinade two or three times. This will give the ribs full flavour and a beautiful glaze .

6. After turning ribs on the other side, place back in oven for another 25mins, When the meat is cooked, it will fall off the bone easily. Remove from oven and allow to cool on the tray.

7. For some extra sauce, put the remainder of the marinade into a small saucepan. Add a small drop of water and bring to a boil; reduce heat and allow to simmer for about 5 minutes until the sauce has thickened. If it's too thick, add a little more water.

8. Cut the pork ribs and sprinkle with some toasted sesame seeds and serve with a fresh vegetable salad, boiled jasmine rice and the extra BBQ sauce.


Broccoli, Fermented Black Bean & Peas With Sichuan Peppercorns

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Broccoli, Fermented Black Bean & Peas With Sichuan Peppercorns. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann 

Broccoli, Fermented Black Bean & Peas With Sichuan Peppercorns. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann 

Broccoli, Fermented Black Bean & Peas With Sichuan Peppercorns. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann 

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 teaspoon of sesame oil

500g tender stem broccoli, trimmed to 1cm at base of stem

20g Sichuan peppercorns

50g Irish rapeseed oil

15g Chinese black vinegar

4 garlic cloves, chopped

20g fermented black beans, available in Asian stores

200g green peas, get frozen ones if you cannot source fresh ones

4 tbsp vegetarian mushroom oyster sauce, or oyster sauce

2 tsp sugar

Pinch of salt

1 tbsp light soy sauce

Method

1. Boil water with a pinch of salt in a large pot. Add teaspoon of sesame oil and cook the broccoli for around 1 minute until it still tender and crunchy. Drain and leave a in the pot.

2. Heat up a small sauce pan and when hot, turn down the flame. Add in the Sichuan peppercorns for 2 mins. This will release the tangy, unique flavour of the peppercorns. Add 40g of the rapeseed oil, take off the heat. Set aside and let it sit to infuse for 10 mins. Add the Chinese black vinegar, whisk to combine and leave to one side.

3. Heat the remaining 10g of rapeseed oil in a wok. Fry the chopped garlic until brown. Do not burn, as this will give a bitter taste to the finished dish. Add the black beans and keep the wok at a medium heat until the full aroma has been released from the beans.

4. Add in the broccoli and peas. Turn the heat to medium and stir fry for 2 minutes.

5. Add in the oyster sauce, soy sauce, sugar and a pinch of salt to taste. Mix well and serve warm in a bowl with a drizzle of the Sichuan peppercorn dressing on top.

Kwanghi's restaurant Bowls on Marlborough Street, Dublin 1, is among the restaurants offering lunar feasts in the Carroll's Irish Gifts Taste of Asia programme as part of the Dublin Chinese New Year Festival, which runs until February 10. See dublinchinesenewyear.com


King Prawn Potsticker Dumplings

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King Prawn Potsticker Dumplings. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

King Prawn Potsticker Dumplings. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

King Prawn Potsticker Dumplings. Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Makes 30 dumplings

Ingredients

For the filling:

500g king prawns, de-veined

50g bamboo shoots, finely chopped

5g ginger

6g cornflower

50g scallions, finely sliced

5g garlic, minced in garlic press

6g sugar

6 tsp soy sauce

3 tsp sesame oil

1 tbps Shaoxing cooking wine, available in most Asian supermarkets

¼ tsp ground white pepper and salt

30 dumpling or gyoza wrappers (or you can also use won ton wrappers, available from Asian markets)

Dampened cloth or paper towel

5 tbsp vegetable cooking oil

Method

1. Clean and de-vein the king prawns. Marinate with a pinch of salt for 5 minutes and wash thoroughly under running water.

2. Chop the prawns coarsely, followed by the bamboo shoots.

3. Put the prawns, bamboo shoots, ginger, cornflower, scallions, garlic and sugar in a bowl and stir to combine.

4. Whisk together soy sauce, sesame oil and cooking wine in a bowl and then stir into the prawn mixture. Add in pepper and salt.

5. Place this mixture into a food processor for 5-6 minutes until it is a sticky consistency.

6. On a dry surface, lay out one gyoza or dumpling wrapper, keeping the remaining wrappers covered with a dampened cloth or paper towel.

7. Spoon one teaspoon of filling into the centre, then moisten halfway around the edge with a wet finger. Fold the dry half of the wrapper over the wet half to form a half-moon shape.

8. To seal, using thumb and forefinger of one hand, form tiny pleats along the dry edge of the wrapper, pressing the pleats against the moistened border to enclose the filling. The dumpling will curve in a semi-circle Or you can start in the middle, pleat out to one edge then turn the dumpling over, and pleat in the opposite direction.

9. Stand the dumpling, seam-side up, on a baking sheet and gently press to flatten the bottom. Cover loosely with dampened cloth or paper towel. Form the remaining dumplings in the same way. If you cannot perfect the pleating method, just pinch the edges together to create a seal.

10. Heat the oil in a large, non-stick skillet or frying pan over a moderately high heat, until it is hot, but not smoking.

11. Remove it from heat and arrange the potstickers in a tight circular pattern, standing up in the oil. They should touch one another. Cook, uncovered, until the bottoms are pale golden, for two to three minutes on a medium heat, to avoid them burning. You just want to crisp up the base at this stage.

12. Add an espresso coffee cup amount of water, then cover the pan tightly with a lid and cook until the liquid has evaporated. The bottom of the dumplings should be crisp and golden after three to five minutes. Add two more tablespoons of water if the pan looks dry before the bottoms are browned.

13. Remove the lid and shake the pan to loosen the pot stickers, until the steam dissipates.

14. Serve immediately with dips and pickled salads of choice on the side.

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Kwanghi Chan, photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Kwanghi Chan, photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Kwanghi Chan, photography by Jennifer Oppermann

Food styling and photography by Jennifer Oppermann

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