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Carbon counting: How your Friday night takeaway is affecting the environment

We all love the convenience of a takeaway — but how many of us think about what our Friday-night treat is doing to the planet? From carbon-rated menus to packaging, we speak to two companies trying to offset the environmental impact of fast-food deliveries

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Takeaway food comes at a huge cost to the environment

Takeaway food comes at a huge cost to the environment

The new carbon-rated menu at Camile Thai. Picture: Tony Gavin

The new carbon-rated menu at Camile Thai. Picture: Tony Gavin

Camile Thai managing director Daniel Greene. Picture: Tony Gavin

Camile Thai managing director Daniel Greene. Picture: Tony Gavin

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Takeaway food comes at a huge cost to the environment

For many people, a takeaway on a Friday or Saturday night is a treat they feel they’ve earned after cooking and washing up all week. But for those attempting to watch their carbon footprint, it can be a shock to learn just how bad for the environment home-delivered food can be.

A UK study published by energy company Uswitch found that the carbon footprint of households spending €50 a week on takeaways is up to 450pc higher than those that don’t get food delivered. The reason isn’t hard to understand — takeaway food traditionally comes in single-use plastic containers, and its convenience comes with a cost to the environment.


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