Thursday 18 April 2019

'That game shouldn't be allowed' - Britain's Prince Harry calls for ban on world's most popular game 'Fortnite'

Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan walk through the walled public Andalusian Gardens which has exotic plants, flowers and fruit trees during a visit on February 25, 2019 in Rabat, Morocco. (Photo by Facundo Arrizabalaga - Pool/Getty Images)
Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan walk through the walled public Andalusian Gardens which has exotic plants, flowers and fruit trees during a visit on February 25, 2019 in Rabat, Morocco. (Photo by Facundo Arrizabalaga - Pool/Getty Images)
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex walk through the walled public Andalusian Gardens which has exotic plants, flowers and fruit trees during a visit on February 25, 2019 in Rabat, Morocco. (Photo by Facundo Arrizabalaga - Pool/Getty Images)
Harry and Meghan during their wedding service (Jonathan Brady/PA)
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (Richard Pohle/The Times)
(L-R) Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (L), talks with Britain's Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (R) as Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, stand by attending the Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey in London on March 11, 2019
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Britain's Prince Harry has called for a ban on the popular video game 'Fortnite'.

'Fortnite' is the most popular game in the world, with 250 million players.

Prince Harry launched a scathing attack on gaming and social media at a YMCA event in London today, the BBC reported.

He said: "That game shouldn't be allowed. Where is the benefit of having it in your household?

"It's created to addict, an addiction to keep you in front of a computer for as long as possible. It's so irresponsible.

"It's like waiting for the damage to be done and kids turning up on your doorsteps and families being broken down."

Harry also said that social media was "more addictive than alcohol and drugs".

Earlier this week, assistant general secretary of the Association of Secondary Teachers Ireland (ASTI) Moira Leydon said teachers had been "expressing concern about the overuse and amount of time children are spending gaming".

Ms Leydon said children were attending school "exhausted, falling asleep in class, being hyperactive" after spending too long gaming.

One Dublin principal claimed children as young as seven were "addicted" to the game. "I have a couple of children in one class, seven-year-olds, who are addicted to 'Fortnite'," she said.

"It's affecting their sleep. One little boy is tired in the morning coming in. I ask were you up last night and he tells me he was on 'Fortnite'.

"These are first-class children, just seven-year-olds. That game is a babysitter for some parents, to keep the children quiet.

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