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Smoke ban for cars with child passengers

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The study testing the urine of 14 people who sat in the back seat of a parked sports vehicle while a person in the driver's seat smoked three cigarettes over an hour.

The study testing the urine of 14 people who sat in the back seat of a parked sports vehicle while a person in the driver's seat smoked three cigarettes over an hour.

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The study testing the urine of 14 people who sat in the back seat of a parked sports vehicle while a person in the driver's seat smoked three cigarettes over an hour.

It will shortly be illegal for adults in Ireland to smoke in cars where children are passengers, with fines of around €80 to be imposed for breaking the law.

The ban is particularly timely in light of new research indicating that non-smoking people, who sit in parked cars with smokers, inhale some of the same cancer-causing substances and other toxins.

Simply by sitting in cars with smokers, passengers breathe in a host of potentially dangerous compounds from tobacco smoke that are associated with cancer, heart disease and lung disease.

The study in the journal Cancer, Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention involved testing the urine of 14 people who sat in the back seat of a parked sports vehicle while a person in the driver's seat smoked three cigarettes over an hour.

The windows of the vehicle were open about four inches. Urine tests revealed that the non-smokers' bodies showed signs of higher levels of several toxic chemicals "thought to be the most important among the thousands in tobacco smoke that cause smoking-related disease".

The authors said: "This tells us that people, especially children and adults with pre-existing health conditions such as asthma or a history of heart disease, should be protected from second-hand smoke exposure in cars."

Health & Living


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