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Dr David Coleman: How to help children handle emotions associated with ongoing grief

The queen’s funeral this week may have stirred up feelings of loss and sadness for many people

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Britain’s Prince George and Princess Charlotte on the day of the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth. Photo: REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Britain’s Prince George and Princess Charlotte on the day of the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth. Photo: REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Britain’s Prince George and Princess Charlotte on the day of the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth. Photo: REUTERS/Hannah McKay

The queen’s death and her funeral earlier this week have received global coverage and the outpouring of grief in the UK has been significant. I am always intrigued when there is huge public grief about a person who was not personally known to them. It may be that the death of the public figure, while saddening in its own right, is likely to echo, magnify or recall other significant losses in our personal lives.

We tend to bury trauma deep in our inner emotional world. We can’t keep the feelings too close to the surface all the time, as they tend to be overwhelming and so we naturally put them aside, often using healthy ways to distract ourselves.


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